baraza

(redirected from barazas)

baraza

(baˈraza)
n
1. (Sociology) a place where public meetings are held
2. (Sociology) a palaver or meeting
[C19: from Swahili]
References in periodicals archive ?
The administrator asked chiefs to use their barazas to mobilize persons living with disability to come out and apply for the equipment from the government to boost their living standards.
CSs are chaps who are more at ease when making PowerPoint presentations at conferences and seminars than addressing public barazas in remote areas.
Through convening barazas (Kiswahili for community gathering), HSNP representatives explained the program and the technology.
They were worried that the advent of war could disrupt labor supply in colonial Kenya because it could spark off flights of young men afraid of forced labor as happened during World War I when young men were summoned to barazas [meetings] with colonial officials and were virtually kidnapped when they came to those meetings.
Women were neither allowed to take part in economic activities nor attend barazas (meetings), and always took the back seat in development matters in the community.
Popular communicative spaces reminiscent of the barazas of yore, need to be urgently created to enable the peoples of East Africa articulate freely their opinions and help chart their own destiny.
Government agents have in the past held weekly barazas (meetings) on the impact of deforestation, but with the refugees, they have become aloof and the hosts feel discriminated against in favour of the refugees.
The broader conflict between rich and poor finds expression in acts of resistance and escape, as in the growth of parallel economies beyond the grasp of decayed states, or even in the confrontations between elites and masses in such public rituals of politics as the rural barazas (mass public meetings) of Kenya.
In most cases, those attending barazas (public meetings), most of whom are elderly, find it cynical listening to young women they consider their daughters or grand daughters, talking to them about how to plan their families (Akong'a, 1988).
Community mobilization and participation are achieved through interaction with farmers by the planning teams, the formation of catchment committees by the farmers themselves, and intensified publicity and training through field days, barazas (public meetings), demonstrations, and tours.
Nuru Kenya programme officer Victor Simon says they have reached over 140,000 residents in Kuria through the programme, which includes monthly barazas with locals.
The DCC said that the government would hold barazas, following the increase in gambling and other illegal games in the area.