barbarian


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bar·bar·i·an

 (bär-bâr′ē-ən)
n.
1.
a. A member of one of the non-Greek peoples in the ancient world, regarded by the ancient Greeks as culturally inferior.
b. A member of any of various peoples living outside the Roman Empire or not fully integrated into Greco-Roman civilization.
2. A member of a people considered uncivilized or culturally inferior by members of another people.
3. A fierce, brutal, or cruel person.
4. An insensitive, uncultured person. See Synonyms at boor.

[French barbarien, from barbare, barbarous, from Latin barbarus; see barbarous.]

bar·bar′i·an adj.
bar·bar′i·an·ism n.

barbarian

(bɑːˈbɛərɪən)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) a member of a primitive or uncivilized people
2. a coarse, insensitive, or uncultured person
3. a vicious person
adj
4. of an uncivilized culture
5. insensitive, uncultured, or brutal
[C16: see barbarous]
barˈbarianism n

bar•bar•i•an

(bɑrˈbɛər i ən)

n.
1. a person regarded as savage, primitive, or uncivilized, esp. a person belonging to a culture different from one's own.
2. a person without culture, refinement, or education; philistine.
3. (esp. in ancient and medieval times) a foreigner: applied orig. to non-Greeks and to those outside the Roman Empire.
adj.
4. uncivilized; crude; savage.
5. foreign; alien.
[1540–50; < Latin barbari(a) barbarous country (see barbarous, -ia) + -an1]
bar•bar′i•an•ism, n.

barbarian

- Based on Greek barbaros, "stranger" or "enemy."
See also related terms for stranger.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barbarian - a member of an uncivilized peoplebarbarian - a member of an uncivilized people  
primitive, primitive person - a person who belongs to an early stage of civilization
anthropophagite, anthropophagus, cannibal, man-eater - a person who eats human flesh
headhunter, head-shrinker - a savage who cuts off and preserves the heads of enemies as trophies
hunter-gatherer - a member of a hunting and gathering society
Vandal - a member of the Germanic people who overran Gaul and Spain and North Africa and sacked Rome in 455
2.barbarian - a crude uncouth ill-bred person lacking culture or refinementbarbarian - a crude uncouth ill-bred person lacking culture or refinement
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
Adj.1.barbarian - without civilizing influencesbarbarian - without civilizing influences; "barbarian invaders"; "barbaric practices"; "a savage people"; "fighting is crude and uncivilized especially if the weapons are efficient"-Margaret Meade; "wild tribes"
noncivilised, noncivilized - not having a high state of culture and social development

barbarian

noun
1. savage, monster, beast, brute, yahoo, swine, ogre, sadist Our maths teacher was a bully and a complete barbarian.
2. lout, hooligan, illiterate, vandal, yahoo, bigot, philistine, ned (Scot. slang), hoon (Austral. & N.Z.), ruffian, ignoramus, boor, boot boy, lowbrow, vulgarian The visitors looked upon us all as barbarians.

barbarian

noun
An unrefined, rude person:
adjective
Translations
barbaar
غَيْر حَضاري، غَيْر مُتَمَدِّنهمجي، بربري، هَمَجي، مُتَوَحِّش
barbarbarbarský
barbarbarbarisk
barbarbarbarinbarbarskidivljački
barbár
barbari, villimaîurvillimannlegur, ósiîmenntaîur
barbar
barbarkabauygar olmayan kimsevahşi

barbarian

[bɑːˈbɛərɪən]
A. ADJbárbaro
B. Nbárbaro/a m/f

barbarian

[bɑːrˈbɛərɪən]
n
(in history) (= foreigner) → barbare m
(pejorative) (= cruel person) → barbare m
(pejorative) (= uncultured person) → barbare m
adj
(in history) [tribe, horde] → barbare; [invasion] → barbare
(pejorative) [attitude] → barbare; [practice] → barbare

barbarian

n (Hist, fig) → Barbar(in) m(f)
adj (Hist, fig) → barbarisch

barbarian

[bɑːˈbɛərɪən] nbarbaro/a

barbarous

(ˈbaːbərəs) adjective
1. uncultured and uncivilized. barbarous habits.
2. brutal. a barbarous assault.
ˈbarbarousness noun
barˈbarian (-ˈbeəriən) noun
an uncultured and uncivilized person.
adjective
barbarian customs.
References in classic literature ?
The vapor of the broiled fish arose like incense from the shrine of a barbarian idol, while the fragrance of the Mocha might have gratified the nostrils of a tutelary Lar, or whatever power has scope over a modern breakfast-table.
As this glad ship of good luck bore down upon the moody Pequod, the barbarian sound of enormous drums came from her forecastle; and drawing still nearer, a crowd of her men were seen standing round her huge try-pots, which, covered with the parchment-like poke or stomach skin of the black fish, gave forth a loud roar to every stroke of the clenched hands of the crew.
As it advanced, the mender of roads would discern without surprise, that it was a shaggy-haired man, of almost barbarian aspect, tall, in wooden shoes that were clumsy even to the eyes of a mender of roads, grim, rough, swart, steeped in the mud and dust of many highways, dank with the marshy moisture of many low grounds, sprinkled with the thorns and leaves and moss of many byways through woods.
I heard that the man with the wooden leg, whose name was Tungay, was an obstinate barbarian who had formerly assisted in the hop business, but had come into the scholastic line with Mr.
Did I not see her caught up into the air, in spite of cries which would have softened the heart of any one but the barbarian who has robbed me of her?
The barbarian chieftain, who defended his country against the Roman invasion, driven to the remotest extremity of Britain, and stimulating his followers to battle by all that has power of persuasion upon the human heart, concluded his persuasion by an appeal to these irresistible feelings: "Think of your forefathers and of your posterity.
For thou shouldst know, Sancho, if thou dost not know, that two things alone beyond all others are incentives to love, and these are great beauty and a good name, and these two things are to be found in Dulcinea in the highest degree, for in beauty no one equals her and in good name few approach her; and to put the whole thing in a nutshell, I persuade myself that all I say is as I say, neither more nor less, and I picture her in my imagination as I would have her to be, as well in beauty as in condition; Helen approaches her not nor does Lucretia come up to her, nor any other of the famous women of times past, Greek, Barbarian, or Latin; and let each say what he will, for if in this I am taken to task by the ignorant, I shall not be censured by the critical.
The bourgeoisie, by the rapid improvement of all instruments of production, by the immensely facilitated means of communication, draws all, even the most barbarian, nations into civilisation.
The strangest figures we saw were the Slovaks, who were more barbarian than the rest, with their big cow-boy hats, great baggy dirty-white trousers, white linen shirts, and enormous heavy leather belts, nearly a foot wide, all studded over with brass nails.
It was revealed to him that he had been a barbarian, a beast.
Let us make a foray upon the dominions of that noisy barbarian, a great raid from Finisterre to Hatteras, catching his fishermen unawares, baffling the fleets that trust to his power, and shooting sly arrows into the livers of men who court his good graces.
He has lost the noble traits of the barbarian, without acquiring the redeeming graces of a civilized being; and, although a member of the Hawiian Temperance Society, is a most inveterate dram-drinker.