barbarism

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bar·ba·rism

 (bär′bə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The condition of having no civilizing influences or refined culture; ignorance or crudity: "the struggles made by different nations, as they emerge from barbarism, to supply themselves with some visible symbol of thought" (William Hickling Prescott).
b. Savage violence or cruelty: "To say that the barbarism of one side [in World War I] impelled the barbarism of the other is not much of an excuse" (David A. Bell).
2.
a. The use of words, forms, or expressions considered incorrect or unacceptable.
b. A specific word, form, or expression so used.

[Latin barbarismus, use of a foreign tongue or of one's own tongue amiss, barbarism, from Greek barbarismos, from barbarizein, to behave or speak like a barbarian, from barbaros, non-Greek, foreign (imitative of the sound of unintelligible speech).]

barbarism

(ˈbɑːbəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. a brutal, coarse, or ignorant act
2. the condition of being backward, coarse, or ignorant
3. (Linguistics) a substandard or erroneously constructed or derived word or expression; solecism
4. any act or object that offends against accepted taste
[C16: from Latin barbarismus error of speech, from Greek barbarismos, from barbaros barbarous]

bar•ba•rism

(ˈbɑr bəˌrɪz əm)

n.
1. a barbarous or uncivilized state or condition.
2. a barbarous act.
3. the use of words or constructions felt to be undesirably alien to the established standards of a language.
4. such a word or construction.
[1570–80; < Latin < Greek]

barbarism

the use of terms or constructions feit by some to be undesirably foreign to the established customs of the language. — barbarian, n., adj.
See also: Language Style

barbarism

An expression or use of words that is considered unacceptable or incorrect.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barbarism - a brutal barbarous savage actbarbarism - a brutal barbarous savage act  
atrocity, inhumanity - an act of atrocious cruelty

barbarism

barbarism

noun
A term that offends against established usage standards:
Translations

barbarism

[ˈbɑːbərɪzəm] N
1. (= cruelty) → barbarie f
2. (Gram) → barbarismo m

barbarism

[ˈbɑːrbərɪzəm] n (= savagery) → barbarie f

barbarism

n
(Hist, fig) → Barbarei f
(Ling) → Barbarismus m

barbarism

[ˈbɑːbəˌrɪzəm] n (of society) → barbarie f inv, barbarismo
References in classic literature ?
And in the good days coming, when John Barleycorn will have been banished out of existence along with the other barbarisms, some other institution than the saloon will have to obtain, some other congregating place of men where strange men and stranger men may get in touch, and meet, and know.
And if we ascend the cathedral, without mentioning a thousand barbarisms of every sort,--what has become of that charming little bell tower, which rested upon the point of intersection of the cross-roofs, and which, no less frail and no less bold than its neighbor (also destroyed), the spire of the Sainte-Chapelle, buried itself in the sky, farther forward than the towers, slender, pointed, sonorous, carved in open work.
If he struggled up from barbarism, and still more remotely from the lower Primates, his ideal should be to surpass man himself and reach Superman (see especially the Prologue).
He maintained, with peculiar satisfaction, it seemed, that maiden modesty is a mere relic of barbarism, and that nothing could be more natural than for a man still youngish to handle a young girl naked.
Among our still more modern and dashing young gentlemen -- who are extremely averse to superfluous effort and supremely indifferent to the purity of their native language -- the formula is still further curtailed by the use of "to feel" in a technical sense, meaning, "to recommend-for-the-purposes-of-feeling-and-being-felt"; and at this moment the "slang" of polite or fast society in the upper classes sanctions such a barbarism as "Mr.
Monsters such as he is belong to an earlier and more rudimentary stage of barbarism.
And at last he says: "As barbarism crept in they were no longer called Britons, but Welsh, a word derived either from Gualo, one of their dukes, or from Guales, their Queen, or else from their being barbarians.