barbarous


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bar·ba·rous

 (bär′bər-əs)
adj.
1. Primitive or undeveloped in culture and customs; uncivilized.
2. Lacking refinement or culture; coarse: inappropriate, barbarous behavior.
3. Characterized by savagery; very cruel: a barbarous punishment; a barbarous tyrant.
4. Marked by the use or occurrence of barbarisms in spoken or written language.

[From Latin barbarus, from Greek barbaros, non-Greek, foreign; see barbarism.]

bar′ba·rous·ly adv.
bar′ba·rous·ness n.

barbarous

(ˈbɑːbərəs)
adj
1. uncivilized; primitive
2. brutal or cruel
3. lacking refinement
[C15: via Latin from Greek barbaros barbarian, non-Greek, in origin imitative of incomprehensible speech; compare Sanskrit barbara stammering, non-Aryan]
ˈbarbarously adv
ˈbarbarousness n

bar•ba•rous

(ˈbɑr bər əs)

adj.
1. uncivilized; wild; savage.
2. savagely cruel or harsh: barbarous treatment of war prisoners.
3. full of harsh sounds; noisy; discordant: wild and barbarous music.
4. not conforming to classical standards or accepted usage, as language.
5. foreign; alien.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin barbarus < Greek bárbaros non-Greek, barbarian; see -ous]
bar′ba•rous•ly, adv.
bar′ba•rous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.barbarous - (of persons or their actions) able or disposed to inflict pain or sufferingbarbarous - (of persons or their actions) able or disposed to inflict pain or suffering; "a barbarous crime"; "brutal beatings"; "cruel tortures"; "Stalin's roughshod treatment of the kulaks"; "a savage slap"; "vicious kicks"
inhumane - lacking and reflecting lack of pity or compassion; "humans are innately inhumane; this explains much of the misery and suffering in the world"; "biological weapons are considered too inhumane to be used"
2.barbarous - primitive in customs and culture
noncivilised, noncivilized - not having a high state of culture and social development

barbarous

adjective
2. brutal, cruel, savage, vicious, ruthless, ferocious, monstrous, barbaric, heartless, inhuman, merciless, remorseless, pitiless It was a barbarous attack on a purely civilian train.

barbarous

adjective
2. Showing or suggesting a disposition to be violently destructive without scruple or restraint:
Translations
بَرْبَري، غَيْر مُتَحَضِّروَحْشي
barbarský
barbarisk
ósiîmenntaîurvillimannlegur
barbarasbarbariškasbarbariškumasbarbarųlaukinis
barbarisksbrutālsnežēlīgs
çok zalimgaddarkabamedeniyetsizuyar olmayan

barbarous

[ˈbɑːbərəs] ADJbárbaro

barbarous

[ˈbɑːrbərəs] adj (= savage) [action, treatment, practice] → barbare

barbarous

adj (Hist, fig) → barbarisch; (= cruel)grausam; guard etcroh; accentgrauenhaft

barbarous

(ˈbaːbərəs) adjective
1. uncultured and uncivilized. barbarous habits.
2. brutal. a barbarous assault.
ˈbarbarousness noun
barˈbarian (-ˈbeəriən) noun
an uncultured and uncivilized person.
adjective
barbarian customs.
References in classic literature ?
Numberless recent massacres were still vivid in their recollections; nor was there any ear in the provinces so deaf as not to have drunk in with avidity the narrative of some fearful tale of midnight murder, in which the natives of the forests were the principal and barbarous actors.
They carried this expedition so secretly, that the unwary inhabitants did not discover them, until they fired upon the forts; and, not being prepared to oppose them, were obliged to surrender themselves miserable captives to barbarous savages, who immediately after tomahawked one man and two women, and loaded all the others with heavy baggage, forcing them along toward their towns, able or unable to march.
They at first attributed it to the change in their own habits during the last three months, and their having become barbarous and countrified in their seclusion.
I love to sail forbidden seas, and land on barbarous coasts.
That night, in the mid-watch, when the old man --as his wont at intervals --stepped forth from the scuttle in which he leaned, and went to his pivot-hole, he suddenly thrust out his face fiercely, snuffing up the sea air as a sagacious ship's dog will, in drawing nigh to some barbarous isle.
I think that's a barbarous thing," said Miss Ophelia, "but I don't think you are all barbarians.
I see in my mind a herd of wild creatures swarming over the earth, and to each the herdsman has affixed some barbarous sound in his own dialect.
This woman of whom he writes--whoever she be--or any one, in short, but your own dear self, mama, and Edward, may have been so barbarous to bely me.
It deepened the impenetrable mystery of the truckle-bed; for it showed plainly that old Mazey had no barbarous preference of his own for passing his nights in the corridor; he occupied that strange and comfortless sleeping-place purely and entirely on his master's account.
As when the potent Rod Of AMRAMS Son in EGYPTS evill day Wav'd round the Coast, up call'd a pitchy cloud Of LOCUSTS, warping on the Eastern Wind, That ore the Realm of impious PHAROAH hung Like Night, and darken'd all the Land of NILE: So numberless were those bad Angels seen Hovering on wing under the Cope of Hell 'Twixt upper, nether, and surrounding Fires; Till, as a signal giv'n, th' uplifted Spear Of their great Sultan waving to direct Thir course, in even ballance down they light On the firm brimstone, and fill all the Plain; A multitude, like which the populous North Pour'd never from her frozen loyns, to pass RHENE or the DANAW, when her barbarous Sons Came like a Deluge on the South, and spread Beneath GIBRALTAR to the LYBIAN sands.
Tell this not in Gath, lest the Scots rejoice that they have at length found a parallel instance among their neighbours, to that barbarous deed which demolished Arthur's Oven.
My answer was, "that we were overstocked with books of travels: that nothing could now pass which was not extraordinary; wherein I doubted some authors less consulted truth, than their own vanity, or interest, or the diversion of ignorant readers; that my story could contain little beside common events, without those ornamental descriptions of strange plants, trees, birds, and other animals; or of the barbarous customs and idolatry of savage people, with which most writers abound.