barbless


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barbless

(ˈbɑːblɪs)
adj
without a barb
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
It is barbless, and in place of the barb, the hook is filed long and tapering to a point as sharp as that of a needle.
He hauled in forty or fifty feet with a young sturgeon still fast in a tangle of barbless hooks, slashed that much of the line free with his knife, and tossed it into the cockpit beside the prisoners.
We have not banned fishing with bait for sea trout - the proposals require a small barbless hook and a single worm, to reduce the risk of accidentally catching salmon.
Hooks don't simply 'rust away' like people think and barbless hooks and 'circle hooks' are safer and easier to remove.
Other prizes to be won in coming weeks are packs of salmon flies from the Caledonian Fly Company and a selection of hand-tied barbless Trout Flies donated by the Barbless-Fly Company.
Making the single hook barbless takes things a step farther.
One coarse angler had to fish considerably closer in to catch roach after returning 27 rainbows fishing barbless at that distance between the Dam Wall and the stream on the south bank.
The rest all came steadily and I must have dropped seven or eight fish because we were fishing barbless.
You can also use barbless hooks, or crimp the barb on your hooks to make them barbless.
Only barbless hooks can now be used on all club waters.
It suggests a few catch-and-release precautions to help reduce that stress: Fish early in the mornings when water temperatures are lower; fish in lakes and reservoirs with deep waters that provide a cooler refuge for fish; use barbless hooks, land fish quickly and keep them in the water as much as possible; and shift fishing efforts to higher elevation mountain lakes and streams where water temperatures are cooler.
To give fish the best chance of survival, NRW said anglers should use barbless single or double hooks, play the fish quickly, keep it in the water at all times and support the fish facing into the current until it is strong enough to swim away.