barcarole

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bar·ca·role

also bar·ca·rolle  (bär′kə-rōl′)
n.
1. A Venetian gondolier's song with a rhythm suggestive of rowing.
2. A composition imitating a Venetian gondolier's song.

[French, from Italian barcaruola, from barcaruolo, gondolier, from barca, boat, from Latin; see bark3.]

barcarole

(ˈbɑːkəˌrəʊl; -ˌrɒl; ˌbɑːkəˈrəʊl) or

barcarolle

n
1. (Classical Music) a Venetian boat song in a time of six or twelve quaver beats to the bar
2. (Classical Music) an instrumental composition resembling this
[C18: from French, from Italian barcarola, from barcaruolo boatman, from barca boat; see barque]

bar•ca•role

or bar•ca•rolle

(ˈbɑr kəˌroʊl)

n.
1. a boating song of the Venetian gondoliers.
2. a piece of music composed in the style of such songs.
[1605–15; < Venetian barcarola boatman's song]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barcarole - a boating song sung by Venetian gondoliersbarcarole - a boating song sung by Venetian gondoliers
song, vocal - a short musical composition with words; "a successful musical must have at least three good songs"
Translations

barcarole

barcarolle [ˌbɑːkəˈrəʊl] Nbarcarola f
References in periodicals archive ?
DISC 17 Aaron Copland: Piano Sonata; Roger Sessions: From my diary; Kirchner: Piano Sonata; Rorem: Three Barcarolles (released 1963)
Gabriel Faure: Barcarolles for Solo Piano, by Roy Howat.
In 1988, Bernstein wrote a song cycle for two voices called Arias and Barcarolles.
My father maintained an extensive repertoire of sentimental romances, old ballads and barcarolles, popular songs, and czardases, and numbers from operas and operettas, which he sometimes followed with dramatic recitatives, but in his interpretation the sentimentality of the words and melodies would take on a major-key purity, while the sugary sediment would be crystallizing in the silver goblet of his voice, becoming brittle and resonant.
That song moves historically into a form that is not only sung but also played instrumentally without words (the barcarolles of Chopin, Mendelssohn, Faur[acute{e}]), yet still in imitation of boat and water movement.
In my doctoral research on piano barcarolles, I found they began as mysterious Venetian boat songs about love, but by the 20th century some started to make reference to, of all things, death
Copland: Piano Sonata / Sessions: From My Diary / Kirchner: Piano Sonata / Rorem: Three Barcarolles - Leon Fleisher, piano (original LP release 1963)