bard


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bard 1

 (bärd)
n.
1. One of an ancient Celtic order of minstrel poets who composed and recited verses celebrating the legendary exploits of chieftains and heroes.
2. A poet, especially a lyric poet.

[Middle English, from Irish and Scottish Gaelic bard and from Welsh bardd; see gwerə- in Indo-European roots.]

bard′ic adj.

bard 2

also barde  (bärd)
n.
A piece of armor used to protect or ornament a horse.
tr.v. bard·ed, bard·ing, bards
1. To equip (a horse) with bards.
2. To cover (meat) in thin pieces of bacon or fat to preserve moisture during cooking.

[Middle English barde, from Old French, from Old Italian barda, from Arabic barda'a, packsaddle, from Persian pardah; see purdah.]

bard

(bɑːd)
n
1. (Poetry)
a. (formerly) one of an ancient Celtic order of poets who recited verses about the exploits, often legendary, of their tribes
b. (in modern times) a poet who wins a verse competition at a Welsh eisteddfod
2. (Poetry) archaic or literary any poet, esp one who writes lyric or heroic verse or is of national importance
[C14: from Scottish Gaelic; related to Welsh bardd]
ˈbardic adj
ˈbardism n

bard

(bɑːd) or

barde

n
1. (Cookery) a piece of larding bacon or pork fat placed on game or lean meat during roasting to prevent drying out
2. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) an ornamental caparison for a horse
vb (tr)
(Horse Training, Riding & Manège) to place a bard on
[C15: from Old French barde, from Old Italian barda, from Arabic barda`ah packsaddle]

Bard

(bɑːd)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the Bard an epithet of William Shakespeare

bard1

(bɑrd)

n.
1. (formerly) a person who composed and recited epic poems, often while playing the harp, lyre, or the like.
2. one of an ancient Celtic order of composers and reciters of poetry.
3. any poet.
4. the Bard, William Shakespeare.
[1400–50; Middle English < Celtic]
bard′ic, adj.

bard2

or barde

(bɑrd)
n.
1. any of various pieces of defensive armor for a horse.
2. a thin slice of fat or bacon secured to a roast to prevent its drying out while cooking.
v.t.
3. to caparison (a horse) with bards.
4. to cover with bards before cooking.
[1470–80; < Middle French barde < southern Italian dial. barda armor for a horse < Arabic barda‘ah packsaddle < Persian pardah covering]

bard


Past participle: barded
Gerund: barding

Imperative
bard
bard
Present
I bard
you bard
he/she/it bards
we bard
you bard
they bard
Preterite
I barded
you barded
he/she/it barded
we barded
you barded
they barded
Present Continuous
I am barding
you are barding
he/she/it is barding
we are barding
you are barding
they are barding
Present Perfect
I have barded
you have barded
he/she/it has barded
we have barded
you have barded
they have barded
Past Continuous
I was barding
you were barding
he/she/it was barding
we were barding
you were barding
they were barding
Past Perfect
I had barded
you had barded
he/she/it had barded
we had barded
you had barded
they had barded
Future
I will bard
you will bard
he/she/it will bard
we will bard
you will bard
they will bard
Future Perfect
I will have barded
you will have barded
he/she/it will have barded
we will have barded
you will have barded
they will have barded
Future Continuous
I will be barding
you will be barding
he/she/it will be barding
we will be barding
you will be barding
they will be barding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been barding
you have been barding
he/she/it has been barding
we have been barding
you have been barding
they have been barding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been barding
you will have been barding
he/she/it will have been barding
we will have been barding
you will have been barding
they will have been barding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been barding
you had been barding
he/she/it had been barding
we had been barding
you had been barding
they had been barding
Conditional
I would bard
you would bard
he/she/it would bard
we would bard
you would bard
they would bard
Past Conditional
I would have barded
you would have barded
he/she/it would have barded
we would have barded
you would have barded
they would have barded

bard

To tie slices of fatty bacon over the breast of poultry or game.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bard - a lyric poetbard - a lyric poet        
poet - a writer of poems (the term is usually reserved for writers of good poetry)
2.bard - an ornamental caparison for a horsebard - an ornamental caparison for a horse
caparison, trapping, housing - stable gear consisting of a decorated covering for a horse, especially (formerly) for a warhorse
Verb1.bard - put a caparison on; "caparison the horses for the festive occasion"
adorn, decorate, grace, ornament, embellish, beautify - make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"

bard

noun (Archaic or literary) poet, singer, rhymer, minstrel, lyricist, troubadour, versifier the epic and myth which formed the bard's repertoire

bard

noun
One who writes poetry:
Translations

bard

[bɑːd] N (liter) → bardo m, vate m
the Bard (= Shakespeare) → el Vate
the Bard of Avonel Cisne del Avon

Bard

[ˈbɑːrd] n
the Bard (= Shakespeare) → Shakespeare
the Bard of Avon (= Shakespeare) → le chantre d'Avon

bard

[ˈbɑːrd ˈbɑːrd] n (literary) (= poet) → poète m

bard

n
(= minstrel) (esp Celtic) → Barde m; (in Ancient Greece) → (Helden)sänger m
(old Liter, hum: = poet) → Barde m, → Bardin f; the Bard of AvonShakespeare

bard

[bɑːd] nbardo
References in classic literature ?
Never minstrel, or by whatever more suitable name David should be known, drew upon his talents in the presence of more insensible auditors; though considering the singleness and sincerity of his motive, it is probably that no bard of profane song ever uttered notes that ascended so near to that throne where all homage and praise is due.
It had even thrown its gleam, in the sufferer's bard extremity, across the verge of time.
I took what Joe gave me, and found it to be the crumpled playbill of a small metropolitan theatre, announcing the first appearance, in that very week, of "the celebrated Provincial Amateur of Roscian renown, whose unique performance in the highest tragic walk of our National Bard has lately occasioned so great a sensation in local dramatic circles.
But drive farr off the barbarous dissonance Of BACCHUS and his Revellers, the Race Of that wilde Rout that tore the THRACIAN Bard In RHODOPE, where Woods and Rocks had Eares To rapture, till the savage clamor dround Both Harp and Voice; nor could the Muse defend Her Son.
A Saxon bard had called it a feast of the swords a gathering of the eagles to the prey the clashing of bills upon shield and helmet, the shouting of battle more joyful than the clamour of a bridal.
He told me once, with an air of pride, that his five bankruptcies were entirely due to 'The Bard,' as he insisted on calling him.
How she received the sceptre of Cathay, Some bard of defter quill may sing some day;
As the latter have considered the work of the immortal bard as the perfect model from which the principles and rules of the epic art were to be drawn, and by which all similar works were to be judged, so this great political critic appears to have viewed the Constitution of England as the standard, or to use his own expression, as the mirror of political liberty; and to have delivered, in the form of elementary truths, the several characteristic principles of that particular system.
Mother," answered Telemachus, "let the bard sing what he has a mind to; bards do not make the ills they sing of; it is Jove, not they, who makes them, and who sends weal or woe upon mankind according to his own good pleasure.
There was a bard also to sing to them and play his lyre, while two tumblers went about performing in the midst of them when the man struck up with his tune.
There are a few passages in the ensuing chapters which may be thought to bear rather bard upon a reverend order of men, the account of whose proceedings in different quarters of the globe-- transmitted to us through their own hands--very generally, and often very deservedly, receives high commendation.
The rude melody, the production of a bard who won no name, was descriptive of a winter evening in a frontier cottage, when, secured from savage inroad by the high-piled snow-drifts, the family rejoiced by their own fireside.