bardolatry


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bardolatry

(bɑːˈdɒlətrɪ)
n
facetious idolatry or excessive admiration of William Shakespeare

bard•ol•at•ry

(bɑrˈdɒl ə tri)
n.
worship or idolization of Shakespeare.
[1900–05; Bard (of Avon) + -o- + -latry]
bard•ol′at•er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bardolatry - the idolization of William Shakespeare
idolisation, idolization - the act of worshiping blindly and to excess
References in periodicals archive ?
In the introduction and final two chapters of the book, Fuchs engages directly with the textual history of Cardenio, offering sustained critiques of recent bibliographic, academic, and creative approaches to the play in order to question its centrality to the discipline and to demonstrate how its prominence is rooted in both Hispanophobia and good, old-fashioned Bardolatry.
To the Disney Machine," according to Michael Modenessi's critique of the corporation's conservative aesthetic effect, "'Shakespeare' means leftovers of bardolatry freely circulating in ready-to-use packages" (2009, r86).
The correspondents move from bardolatry to fraternal reference: Burns is both fetishized celebrity and brother bard.
The title hints at bardolatry, but the title is something of an irony, for though the first sentence declares with bravado, "Shakespeare as a writer is the embodiment of human freedom" (1), by the second paragraph, Greenblatt cautions that Shakespeare "embodied" limits that "served as the enabling condition of his particular freedom" (1).
It is, however, De Bruyn's comprehensive "Reference Guide" which, by virtue of its alignment with the volume's five main sections, provides an informal conclusion through thematically organised lists of the key published works (eighteenth-century and modern) and thumbnail biographies of the major editors, critics, actors, theatre managers and artists associated with the period's involved process of bardolatry.
As Johnson makes clear throughout, this unexpected focus is as much a challenge to New Historicism as it is to bardolatry.
2) Despite repeated attempts to quench the cult of the Hero as Poet (as Thomas Carlyle defined it), or the phenomenon of Shakespearomanie (as the Germans themselves termed it), bardolatry (as George Bernard Shaw first called it) persisted.
This meant that his recourse to neoclassical strictures by which to deflate the bardolatry of his fellow Romantics coexisted with the saturation of his writing with conscious and unconscious Shakespearean allusions and by the deliberate rewriting and rethinking of certain plays in his own original dramas.
But there's more to Lamb's reservations than a highly orthodox and ascetic Bardolatry.
Bloom credits Hazlitt, along with his own Shakespearean secularism proudly manifest as self-admitted bardolatry, especially in the case of Falstaff.
Bardolatry puts Shakespeare on a pedestal, sets him apart from his fellows, and attributes to his work things that are perhaps more our perceptions than anything else.
This is in part a failure to present the context of the earlier arguments against the author--in the wake of theory, along with the ever-present threat of bardolatry, the case had to be stated strongly.