bare infinitive

bare infinitive

n.
In English, the infinitive without to, as used with modal auxiliary verbs. In the sentence I must go to the store now, the verb go is a bare infinitive.
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In ICAMET the verb DARE is always accompanied by a bare infinitive (and in Middle English in general, cf.
The Spanish of the southwestern United States employs a unique bilingual verb paradigm containing the auxiliary hacer (do) with an English bare infinitive.
This is in line with the fact that in adult English, the bare infinitive is marked for the feature [+perfective], which renders it incompatible with progressive interpretation (see Giorgi and Pianesi 1997).
Modal verbs introducing an expectation for a bare infinitive may be inverted with this infinitive, provided that the two are cluster-final.
But the capacity to take the bare infinitive infinitives shown in (1) is shared with the "core" verbs of physical perception, as illustrated in (3):
2, 6) and is probably an indicator of lower transitivity (compared to a bare infinitive, as in [iii]), as I have shown in Fischer (1996, 1997).
In this last respect, the occurrence of the to or zero-infinitive seems to be linked to the Case subcategorised for by the matrix predicates: oblique, dative, or genitive objects tend to occur with verbs that are constructed with the to-infinitive, whereas accusative objects are more likely to accompany verbs that take the bare infinitive (cf.
Motapanyane and Avram (2000) show that the modal putea `can' undergoes verb restructuring with a bare infinitive.
contains "a bare infinitive functioning as the subject of a passive sentence".
On the basis of these cursory observations Pilch (1955b: 44) builds up the following paradigm of use of the prefix: (i) in present indicative the prefix never occurs as i-, sporadically found as y-, (ii) in present and past subjunctive the prefix occurs as y-, (iii) in bare infinitives preceded by an auxiliary only as y-, (iv) never in present participles, (v) in most instances of preterite participles, usually as y-.