bare infinitive

bare infinitive

n.
In English, the infinitive without to, as used with modal auxiliary verbs. In the sentence I must go to the store now, the verb go is a bare infinitive.
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Note, however, that if the as well as phrase is linking a verb phrase to an infinitive phrase, the verb in the verb phrase should be a bare infinitive (the verb stem, without to):
The verb dare, as well as most Present-Day English modal verbs (other than will), is considered a special verb because of its preterite-present morphology, the defective paradigm, the selection of bare infinitive (henceforth, BI) complementation, the lack of a third person singular--p ending and of participles.
women and twenty-three Kids his bare infinitive didn't die alone I
In Present-Day English the bare infinitive complementation is exclusively restricted to the following types of verbs: (a) verbs of coercive meaning (have, let, make); (b) perceptual verbs of seeing and hearing (feel, hear, notice, observe, overhear, see, watch); (c) a residual class comprising the verbs help and know (Quirk et al.
In ICAMET the verb DARE is always accompanied by a bare infinitive (and in Middle English in general, cf.
Callies's findings state that the bare infinitive construction is used more often in transitive verbs by English speakers in spoken language.
Duffley (1992) further argues that to requires the bare infinitive to be placed after something.
The Spanish of the southwestern United States employs a unique bilingual verb paradigm containing the auxiliary hacer (do) with an English bare infinitive.
Here, he originally used causative don followed by a bare infinitive in four sentences in rapid succession.
First, she notes that, unlike the prevailing tendency in ME and E1, by E3 the bare infinitive is five times as frequent as the to-infinitive.
This is in line with the fact that in adult English, the bare infinitive is marked for the feature [+perfective], which renders it incompatible with progressive interpretation (see Giorgi and Pianesi 1997).
These assumptions will allow me to explain their differences and similarities not only with indicative and subjunctive sentential complements but also with other non-finite forms such as -ing participle clauses and the bare infinitive.