bargain away


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bargain away

vb
(tr, adverb) to lose or renounce (freedom, rights, etc) in return for something valueless or of little value
Translations

w>bargain away

vt sep rights, advantage etcsich (dat)abhandeln lassen; freedom, independence alsoveräußern
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References in periodicals archive ?
Few observers believe the North Korean leader will bargain away lightly what he sees as a guarantee of his dynastic regime's survival.
While the United Nations and the international civil society insist they want a peaceful resolution to the worst humanitarian crisis in the 21st century, Riyadh dismisses the idea of diplomacy in the assessment, saying they wouldn't be willing to bargain away their stated goal, which is regime change in Sana'a.
No power on earth can bargain away the rights of Kashmiris; only they can determine their own political destiny, he maintained.
No one should expect, therefore, that Iran will be inclined to bargain away the political survival of a person it deems vital to its own foreign policy interests.
We have tried to discover our inner core: what are the values we hold to as firm convictions and high ideals, we wish never to bargain away or compromise over; and what mission do I have for living my entire life and pursuing a life-long career, marked out by hard and honest work?
Finally, it is asserted that it is impossible for collective bargaining to function as it should with statutory and extra-statutory government intervention on the horizon; why bargain away something which, hopefully, government intervention of one ort or another might later grant?
Industry experts cite several reasons for the problem: privacy rules that prevent Canada's financial intelligence unit, the Financial Transaction Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC), from freely sharing information with law enforcement; complex investigations that can take understaffed police agencies years to finish; and overworked Crown Prosecutors who often plea bargain away difficult money laundering cases, instead prioritizing drug trafficking charges since they are viewed as having a stronger likelihood of conviction.
Former President Ali-Akbar Hashemi-Rafsanjani is understood to have long advocated an entirely different approach--namely to bargain away Iran's nuclear program and close a profitable deal for the Islamic Republic.