barge


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barge

 (bärj)
n.
1.
a. A long, large, usually flatbottom boat for transporting freight that is generally unpowered and towed or pushed by other craft.
b. A large, open pleasure boat used for parties, pageants, or formal ceremonies.
2. A powerboat reserved for the use of an admiral.
v. barged, barg·ing, barg·es
v.tr.
To carry by barge.
v.intr.
1. To move about clumsily.
2. To intrude or interrupt, especially rudely: barged into the meeting.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin barca, boat; see bark3.]

barge

(bɑːdʒ)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a vessel, usually flat-bottomed and with or without its own power, used for transporting freight, esp on canals
2. (Nautical Terms) a vessel, often decorated, used in pageants, for state occasions, etc
3. (Military) navy a boat allocated to a flag officer, used esp for ceremonial occasions and often carried on board his flagship
4. jocular derogatory any vessel, esp an old or clumsy one
5. (Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) informal Austral a heavy or cumbersome surfboard
vb
6. informal (foll by: into) to bump (into)
7. (tr) informal to push (someone or one's way) violently
8. (intr; foll by into or in) informal to interrupt rudely or clumsily: to barge into a conversation.
9. (Sailing) (tr) sailing to bear down on (another boat or boats) at the start of a race
10. (tr) to transport by barge
11. (intr) informal to move slowly or clumsily
[C13: from Old French, from Medieval Latin barga, probably from Late Latin barca a small boat; see barque]

barge

(bɑrdʒ)

n., v. barged, barg•ing. n.
1. a flat-bottomed vessel, usu. pushed or towed, for transporting freight or passengers; lighter.
2. a vessel of state used in pageants.
3. a naval vessel reserved for a flag officer.
v.i.
4. to move aggressively and clumsily: to barge through a crowd.
5. to move in the slow, heavy manner of a barge.
v.t.
6. to transport by barge.
7. barge in, to intrude, esp. rudely.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Middle French, perhaps < Latin *bārica; see bark3]

barge

A flat-bed, shallow-draft vessel with no superstructure that is used for the transport of cargo and ships' stores or for general utility purposes. See also watercraft.

barge


Past participle: barged
Gerund: barging

Imperative
barge
barge
Present
I barge
you barge
he/she/it barges
we barge
you barge
they barge
Preterite
I barged
you barged
he/she/it barged
we barged
you barged
they barged
Present Continuous
I am barging
you are barging
he/she/it is barging
we are barging
you are barging
they are barging
Present Perfect
I have barged
you have barged
he/she/it has barged
we have barged
you have barged
they have barged
Past Continuous
I was barging
you were barging
he/she/it was barging
we were barging
you were barging
they were barging
Past Perfect
I had barged
you had barged
he/she/it had barged
we had barged
you had barged
they had barged
Future
I will barge
you will barge
he/she/it will barge
we will barge
you will barge
they will barge
Future Perfect
I will have barged
you will have barged
he/she/it will have barged
we will have barged
you will have barged
they will have barged
Future Continuous
I will be barging
you will be barging
he/she/it will be barging
we will be barging
you will be barging
they will be barging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been barging
you have been barging
he/she/it has been barging
we have been barging
you have been barging
they have been barging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been barging
you will have been barging
he/she/it will have been barging
we will have been barging
you will have been barging
they will have been barging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been barging
you had been barging
he/she/it had been barging
we had been barging
you had been barging
they had been barging
Conditional
I would barge
you would barge
he/she/it would barge
we would barge
you would barge
they would barge
Past Conditional
I would have barged
you would have barged
he/she/it would have barged
we would have barged
you would have barged
they would have barged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barge - a flatbottom boat for carrying heavy loads (especially on canals)barge - a flatbottom boat for carrying heavy loads (especially on canals)
boat - a small vessel for travel on water
dredger - a barge (or a vessel resembling a barge) that is used for dredging
houseboat - a barge that is designed and equipped for use as a dwelling
pontoon - (nautical) a floating structure (as a flat-bottomed boat) that serves as a dock or to support a bridge
scow - a barge carrying bulk materials in an open hold
Norfolk wherry, wherry - sailing barge used especially in East Anglia
Verb1.barge - push one's waybarge - push one's way; "she barged into the meeting room"
hie, hotfoot, pelt along, race, rush, rush along, speed, step on it, belt along, bucket along, cannonball along, hasten - move fast; "He rushed down the hall to receive his guests"; "The cars raced down the street"
butt in, chime in, chisel in, barge in, break in, cut in, put in - break into a conversation; "her husband always chimes in, even when he is not involved in the conversation"
2.barge - transport by barge on a body of waterbarge - transport by barge on a body of water
navigation, pilotage, piloting - the guidance of ships or airplanes from place to place
ship, transport, send - transport commercially

barge

noun
1. canal boat, lighter, narrow boat, scow, flatboat He lives on a barge and only works when he has to.
verb
1. (Informal) force, break, push, blast, thrust Students tried to barge their way into the secretariat building.
barge in (on something or someone) (Informal) interrupt, break in (on), muscle in (on) (informal), intrude (on), infringe (on), burst in (on), butt in (on), impose yourself (on), force your way in (on), elbow your way in (on) Sorry to barge in like this, but I need your advice. He just barged in on us while we were having a private conversation.
barge into someone bump into, drive into, press, push against, shoulder, thrust, elbow into, shove into, collide with, jostle with, cannon into He would barge into them and kick them in the shins.
Translations
زَوْرَق لِنَقْل البَضَائِعمَرْكَب كَبير للمَهْرجانات والرّحلاتمَرْكَب نَقْل نَهْرييَتَحَرَّك بِصورَةٍ صاخِبَهيَصْطَدِم بِ
člunmotorový člunnákladní člunpotácet sevpadnout
prambådbrase indbrase ind imase rundt
proomu
barka
bárkanekiütődiktámolyog
rekast áryîjast, vaîastór skipsbáturvaîa/ryîjastvöruflutningaprammi
バージ
바지선
atsitrenkti į kąbaržaįsibrautiįsiveržtimotorlaivis
baržagrīļotiesiedrāztieskuģisliellaiva
nákladný člnpotácať sa
barka
pråm
เรือบรรทุก เรือที่ใช้ในพิธี
mavnapaldır küldür içeri girmekşattoslamakyalpalayarak dolaşmak
sà lan

barge

[bɑːdʒ]
A. N (Naut) → barcaza f; (towed) → lancha f a remolque, gabarra f; (ceremonial) → falúa f
B. VT (= push) → empujar (Sport) → cargar contra
C. VI to barge through a crowdabrirse paso a empujones entre una multitud
to barge past sbapartar a algn de un empujón
D. CPD barge pole Nbichero m
I wouldn't touch it with a barge pole (Brit) (fig) → yo no lo querría ni regalado
barge about barge around VI + ADVmoverse pesadamente, dar tumbos
barge in VI + ADV
1. (= enter) → irrumpir
2. (fig) (= interrupt) → meterse
to barge in on a conversationentrometerse en una conversación
barge into VI + PREP
1. [+ person] → chocar contra; [+ room] → irrumpir en
2. (fig) (= interrupt) → interrumpir

barge

[ˈbɑːrdʒ] n (= boat) → péniche f
by barge [go, travel, transport] → en péniche
barge in
vi
(= walk in) → faire irruption
(= interrupt conversation) → couper la parole
barge in on
vt fus (= walk in on) to barge in on sb → faire irruption chez qn
barge into
vt fus [+ person, building] → rentrer dans
barge past
vt fusbousculer en passant
vifoncerbarge pole n (British) wouldn't touch sb/sth with a barge pole >
I wouldn't touch it with a barge pole → Je n'y toucherais pas avec des pincettes.
I wouldn't touch him with a barge pole
BUT Je ne m'y frotterais pas.bar graph (US) ngraphique m en barres

barge

n
(for freight) → Last- or Frachtkahn m; (unpowered) → Schleppkahn m; (= lighter)Leichter m; (= ship’s boat)Barkasse f; (= houseboat)Hausboot nt; the Royal/state bargedie königliche Barkasse/die Staatsbarkasse; (unpowered) → das königliche Boot/das Staatsboot
(= shove)Stoß m, → Rempler m (inf)
vt
he barged me out of the wayer hat mich weggestoßen; he barged his way into the roomer ist (ins Zimmer) hereingeplatzt (inf); he barged his way through the crowder hat sich durch die Menge geboxt (inf)
(Sport) → rempeln; he barged him off the baller hat ihn vom Ball weggestoßen
vi
to barge into a room(in ein Zimmer) herein-/hineinplatzen (inf); to barge out of a roomaus einem Zimmer heraus-/hinausstürmen; he barged through the crowder drängte or boxte (inf)sich durch die Menge
(Sport) → rempeln

barge

[bɑːdʒ] nchiatta, barcone m; (ceremonial) → lancia
barge in vi + adv (fam, pej) (enter) → precipitarsi dentro, piombare dentro; (interrupt) → intromettersi
barge into vi + prep (fam) (knock) → andare a sbattere contro, urtare contro; (enter) → piombare in; (interrupt) → intromettersi in

barge

(baːdʒ) noun
1. a flat-bottomed boat for carrying goods etc.
2. a large power-driven boat.
verb
1. to move (about) clumsily. He barged about the room.
2. to bump (into). He barged into me.
3. (with in(to)) to push one's way (into) rudely. She barged in without knocking.

barge

زَوْرَق لِنَقْل البَضَائِع člun pram Schleppkahn φορτηγίδα barcaza proomu péniche barka chiatta バージ 바지선 binnenschip lekter barka barcaça, batelão баржа pråm เรือบรรทุก เรือที่ใช้ในพิธี mavna sà lan 驳船
References in classic literature ?
Mournfully from the barge Arthur answered and bade him pray, for "More things are wrought by prayer than the world dreams of," and so he said farewell,
A strayed Indian from Lake Le Barge was willing to take his place; but Kama was obdurate.
Before they gained Lake Le Barge, the land was sheeted with snow that would not melt for half a year.
But the heart of King John sinks before the stern faces of the English fighting men, and the arm of King John drops back on to his rein, and he dismounts and takes his seat in the foremost barge.
An ancient and still bullet-speckled stern-wheel steamer, with a barge lashed to her side, came round the river bend.
One was the barge which he had brought from Mackinaw; another was of a larger size, such as was formerly used in navigating the Mohawk River, and known by the generic name of the Schenectady barge; the other was a large keel boat, at that time the grand conveyance on the Mississippi.
At every mooring-chain and rope, at every stationery boat or barge that split the current into a broad- arrowhead, at the offsets from the piers of Southwark Bridge, at the paddles of the river steamboats as they beat the filthy water, at the floating logs of timber lashed together lying off certain wharves, his shining eyes darted a hungry look.
We must pall the barge all its length in blackest samite.
Then, in order as the eye descends towards the water, are the sides, and doors, and windows of the state- rooms, jumbled as oddly together as though they formed a small street, built by the varying tastes of a dozen men: the whole is supported on beams and pillars resting on a dirty barge, but a few inches above the water's edge: and in the narrow space between this upper structure and this barge's deck, are the furnace fires and machinery, open at the sides to every wind that blows, and every storm of rain it drives along its path.
You see, I'n been with a barge this two 'ear; that's how I'n been gettin' my livin',--if it wasn't when I was tentin' the furnace, between whiles, at Torry's mill.
For, now, the last of the fleet of ships was round the last low point we had headed; and the last green barge, straw-laden, with a brown sail, had followed; and some ballast-lighters, shaped like a child's first rude imitation of a boat, lay low in the mud; and a little squat shoal-lighthouse on open piles, stood crippled in the mud on stilts and crutches; and slimy stakes stuck out of the mud, and slimy stones stuck out of the mud, and red landmarks and tidemarks stuck out of the mud, and an old landing-stage and an old roofless building slipped into the mud, and all about us was stagnation and mud.
I call to mind a winter landscape in Amsterdam - a flat foreground of waste land, with here and there stacks of timber, like the huts of a camp of some very miserable tribe; the long stretch of the Handelskade; cold, stone-faced quays, with the snow-sprinkled ground and the hard, frozen water of the canal, in which were set ships one behind another with their frosty mooring-ropes hanging slack and their decks idle and deserted, because, as the master stevedore (a gentle, pale person, with a few golden hairs on his chin and a reddened nose) informed me, their cargoes were frozen-in up-country on barges and schuyts.