baron


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bar·on

 (băr′ən)
n.
1.
a. A British nobleman of the lowest rank.
b. A nobleman of continental Europe, ranked differently in various countries.
c. A Japanese nobleman of the lowest rank.
d. Used as the title for such a nobleman.
2.
a. A feudal tenant holding his rights and title directly from a king or another feudal superior.
b. A lord or nobleman; a peer.
3. One having great wealth, power, and influence in a specified sphere of activity: an oil baron.
4. A cut of beef consisting of a double sirloin.

[Middle English, from Old French, probably of Germanic origin.]

baron

(ˈbærən)
n
1. (Heraldry) a member of a specific rank of nobility, esp the lowest rank in the British Isles
2. (Historical Terms) (in Europe from the Middle Ages) originally any tenant-in-chief of a king or other overlord, who held land from his superior by honourable service; a land-holding nobleman
3. (Commerce) a powerful businessman or financier: a press baron.
4. (Law) English law (formerly) the title held by judges of the Court of Exchequer
5. (Cookery) short for baron of beef
[C12: from Old French, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German baro freeman, Old Norse berjask to fight]

bar•on

(ˈbær ən)

n.
1. a member of the lowest grade of nobility.
2. (in Britain)
a. a feudal vassal holding his lands under a direct grant from the king.
b. a direct descendant of such a vassal or his equal in the nobility.
c. a member of the House of Lords.
3. a powerful, wealthy man in some industry or activity: railroad barons.
[1200–50; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French, objective case of ber < Frankish *baro]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baron - a nobleman (in various countries) of varying rankbaron - a nobleman (in various countries) of varying rank
noble, nobleman, Lord - a titled peer of the realm
2.baron - a British peer of the lowest rankbaron - a British peer of the lowest rank  
peer - a nobleman (duke or marquis or earl or viscount or baron) who is a member of the British peerage
3.baron - a very wealthy or powerful businessmanbaron - a very wealthy or powerful businessman; "an oil baron"
businessman, man of affairs - a person engaged in commercial or industrial business (especially an owner or executive)
oil tycoon - a powerful person in the oil business

baron

noun
1. nobleman, lord, peer, noble, aristocrat, patrician, grandee Yes, our friend the baron has his problems.
2. tycoon, leader, chief, fat cat (slang, chiefly U.S.), mogul, bigwig (informal), big shot (informal), big cheese (slang, old-fashioned), plutocrat, nabob (informal), Mister Big (slang, chiefly U.S.) the battle against the drug barons
Translations
البارون، النَّبيلشَخْص مُهِم، قُطب
baronmagnát
baronmagnat
paronivapaaherra
bárómágnás
auîjöfurbarón; barónessa
baronasmagnatas
baronsmagnāts
barón
baron
baron
baronkralkralı

baron

[ˈbærən] N
1. (= member of nobility) → barón m (fig) → magnate m
2. baron of beefsolomillo m

baron

[ˈbærən] n
(= nobleman) → baron m
Baron Rothschild → le baron de Rothschild
(= magnate, tycoon) press baron → magnat m de la presse, baron m de la presse
oil baron → magnat m du pétrole, baron m du pétrole
drug baron, drugs baron → baron m de la drogue

baron

n
Baron m
(fig)Baron m, → Magnat m; industrial baronIndustriebaron m; oil baronÖlmagnat m; press baronPressezar m
(of beef)doppeltes Lendenstück

baron

[ˈbærn] nbarone m (fig) → magnate m
the press barons → i baroni della stampa
the oil barons → i magnati del petrolio

baron

(ˈbӕrən) feminine ˈbaroness noun
1. a nobleman. He was made a baron; Baron Rothschild.
2. an important, powerful person. a newspaper baron.
References in classic literature ?
Yesterday at dinner, when an Austrian officer stared at us and then said something to his friend, a rakish-looking baron, about `ein wonderschones Blondchen', Fred looked as fierce as a lion, and cut his meat so savagely it nearly flew off his plate.
He was, in truth, a minstrel of the western continent--of a much later day, certainly, than those gifted bards, who formerly sang the profane renown of baron and prince, but after the spirit of his own age and country; and he was now prepared to exercise the cunning of his craft, in celebration of, or rather in thanksgiving for, the recent victory.
Run over a few: --The Authors of the Bible; Aristotle; Pliny; Aldrovandi; Sir Thomas Browne; Gesner; Ray; Linnaeus; Rondeletius; Willoughby; Green; Artedi; Sibbald; Brisson; Marten; Lacepede; Bonneterre; Desmarest; Baron Cuvier; Frederick Cuvier; John Hunter; Owen; Scoresby; Beale; Bennett; J.
No feudal baron in Magna Charta times could have more thoroughly resented some incursion of the crown.
Baron Trenck, nor Casanova, nor Benvenuto Chel- leeny, nor Henri IV.
But the same worthy person, when placed in his own snug parlour, and surrounded by all the comforts of an Englishman's fireside, is not half so much disposed to believe that his own ancestors led a very different life from himself; that the shattered tower, which now forms a vista from his window, once held a baron who would have hung him up at his own door without any form of trial; that the hinds, by whom his little pet-farm is managed, a few centuries ago would have been his slaves; and that the complete influence of feudal tyranny once extended over the neighbouring village, where the attorney is now a man of more importance than the lord of the manor.
He showed him an ingenious talking-machine that had been made by Baron de Kempelin.
If the chevalier did allow himself this bit of shrewd practice,--which, by the bye, would have won him the regard of the Chevalier de Gramont, a smile from the Baron de Foeneste, a shake of the hand from the Marquis de Moncade,--was he any the less that amiable guest, that witty talker, that imperturbable card-player, that famous teller of anecdotes, in whom all Alencon took delight?
Well, then, I am your servant, Monsieur Baron," said D'Artagnan, "though you have names rather difficult to recollect.
with repressed smile, "come in, Baron, and tell the duke all you know -- the latest news of M.
The contrary happens in kingdoms governed like that of France, because one can easily enter there by gaining over some baron of the kingdom, for one always finds malcontents and such as desire a change.
For my part," said Porthos, "I desire to be made a baron.