baronetcy


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bar·on·et·cy

 (băr′ə-nĭt-sē, -nĕt′sē)
n. pl. bar·on·et·cies
The rank or dignity of a baronet or baronetess.

baronetcy

(ˈbærənɪtsɪ; -ˌnɛt-)
n, pl -cies
(Heraldry) the rank, position, or patent of a baronet

bar•on•et•cy

(ˈbær ə nɪt si, -ˌnɛt)

n., pl. -cies.
the rank or dignity of a baronet.
[1805–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baronetcy - the rank or dignity or position of a baronet or baronessbaronetcy - the rank or dignity or position of a baronet or baroness
rank - relative status; "his salary was determined by his rank and seniority"
2.baronetcy - the title of a baron
title - an appellation signifying nobility; "`your majesty' is the appropriate title to use in addressing a king"
Translations

baronetcy

[ˈbærənɪtsɪ] Ndignidad f del baronet

baronetcy

n (= rank)Baronetstand m; (= title)Baronetswürde f
References in classic literature ?
Pocket and Drummle while I was attentive to my knife and fork, spoon, glasses, and other instruments of self-destruction, that Drummle, whose Christian name was Bentley, was actually the next heir but one to a baronetcy.
Tom Bertram must have been thought pleasant, indeed, at any rate; he was the sort of young man to be generally liked, his agreeableness was of the kind to be oftener found agreeable than some endowments of a higher stamp, for he had easy manners, excellent spirits, a large acquaintance, and a great deal to say; and the reversion of Mansfield Park, and a baronetcy, did no harm to all this.
Aye, there have been generations of Sir Johns among you, and if knighthood were hereditary, like a baronetcy, as it practically was in old times, when men were knighted from father to son, you would be Sir John now.
Sir Leicester and the baronetcy, Sir Leicester and Chesney Wold, Sir Leicester and his ancestors and his patrimony"--Mr.
Besides, he will be very well off some day--he may even get the baronetcy.
A successful medical career which promised to end in a presidentship of a college and a baronetcy, had been cut short by his sudden inheritance of a considerable sum from a grateful patient, which had rendered him independent for life, and had enabled him to turn his attention to the more scientific part of his profession, which had always had a greater charm for him than its more practical and commercial aspect.
Called upon to choose between the course indicated by a physician who is making his five thousand a year, and who is certain of the next medical baronetcy, and the advice volunteered by an obscure general practitioner at the East End of London, who is not making his five hundred a year--need I stop to inform you of her ladyship's decision?
Still more gratifying were the great personal popularity which Scott attained and his recognition as the most eminent of living Scotsmen, of which a symbol was his elevation to a baronetcy in 1820.
Shelley, born in 1792, belonged to a family of Sussex country gentry; a baronetcy bestowed on his grandfather during the poet's youth passed from his father after his own death to his descendants.
The hero of the novel was already almost reaching his English happiness, a baronetcy and an estate, and Anna was feeling a desire to go with him to the estate, when she suddenly felt that HE ought to feel ashamed, and that she was ashamed of the same thing.
The idea that he was not Sir Percival Glyde at all, that he had no more claim to the baronetcy and to Blackwater Park than the poorest labourer who worked on the estate, had never once occurred to my mind.
A baronetcy was spoken of with confidence; a peerage was frequently mentioned.