baroque


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ba·roque

 (bə-rōk′)
adj.
1. also Baroque Of, relating to, or characteristic of a style in art and architecture developed in Europe from the early 17th to mid-18th century, emphasizing dramatic, often strained effect and typified by bold, curving forms, elaborate ornamentation, and overall balance of disparate parts.
2. also Baroque Music Of, relating to, or characteristic of a style of composition that flourished in Europe from about 1600 to 1750, marked by expressive dissonance and elaborate ornamentation.
3. Extravagant, complex, or bizarre, especially in ornamentation: "the baroque, encoded language of post-structural legal and literary theory" (Wendy Kaminer).
4. Irregular in shape: baroque pearls.
n. also Baroque
The baroque style or period in art, architecture, or music.

[French, from Italian barocco, imperfect pearl, and from Portuguese barroco.]

ba·roque′ly adv.
ba·roque′ness n.

baroque

(bəˈrɒk; bəˈrəʊk)
n (often capital)
1. (Architecture) a style of architecture and decorative art that flourished throughout Europe from the late 16th to the early 18th century, characterized by extensive ornamentation
2. (Classical Music) a 17th-century style of music characterized by extensive use of the thorough bass and of ornamentation
3. (Art Terms) any ornate or heavily ornamented style
adj
4. (Historical Terms) denoting, being in, or relating to the baroque
5. (Jewellery) (of pearls) irregularly shaped
[C18: from French, from Portuguese barroco a rough or imperfectly shaped pearl]

ba•roque

(bəˈroʊk)

adj.
1. (often cap.) of or designating a style of architecture and art of the early 17th to mid-18th century, characterized by curvilinear shapes, exuberant decoration, forms suggesting movement, and dramatic effect.
2. (sometimes cap.) of or pertaining to the musical period following the Renaissance, extending roughly from 1600 to 1750.
3. extravagantly ornate in character or style: baroque writing.
4. irregular in shape: baroque pearls.
n.
5. (often cap.) the baroque style or period.
6. an irregularly shaped pearl.
[1755–65; < French < Portuguese barroco, barroca irregularly shaped pearl (of obscure orig.)]

baroque

a highly decorated form of art or ornamentation. — baroque, adj.
See also: Architecture, Art

baroque

1. A style of music characterized by ornamentation and use of counterpoint. The baroque era lasted for about 150 years, beginning in 1600 with the first attempts at opera, and ending in 1750 with the death of its great master, Johann Sebastian Bach.
2. Seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century European furniture of elaborate ornamental character with sweeping Scurves an important feature.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Baroque - the historic period from about 1600 until 1750 when the baroque style of art, architecture, and music flourished in Europe
2.baroque - elaborate and extensive ornamentation in decorative art and architecture that flourished in Europe in the 17th centurybaroque - elaborate and extensive ornamentation in decorative art and architecture that flourished in Europe in the 17th century
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
Adj.1.baroque - having elaborate symmetrical ornamentationbaroque - having elaborate symmetrical ornamentation; "the building...frantically baroque"-William Dean Howells
fancy - not plain; decorative or ornamented; "fancy handwriting"; "fancy clothes"
2.baroque - of or relating to or characteristic of the elaborately ornamented style of architecture, art, and music popular in Europe between 1600 and 1750Baroque - of or relating to or characteristic of the elaborately ornamented style of architecture, art, and music popular in Europe between 1600 and 1750

baroque

adjective ornate, fancy, bizarre, elegant, decorated, elaborate, extravagant, flamboyant, grotesque, convoluted, flowery, rococo, florid, bedecked, overelaborate, overdecorated He was a baroque figure dressed in theatrical, but elegant, clothes.

baroque

adjective
Elaborately and heavily ornamented:
Translations
baroko
barokki

baroque

[bəˈrɒk]
A. ADJ (Archit, Art, Mus) → barroco (also fig)
B. Nbarroco m

baroque

[bəˈrɒk]
adj
(ART, ARCHITECTURE) [architecture, church, interior] → baroque; [period] → baroque
(MUSIC) [music, composer] → baroque
(= extravagant, elaborate) → baroque
n
(ART, ARCHITECTURE) the baroque → le baroque
(MUSIC) the baroque → le baroque

baroque

adjbarock, Barock-
n (= style)Barock m or nt; the baroque perioddas or der Barock, die Barockzeit

baroque

[bəˈrɒk] adjbarocco/a
References in periodicals archive ?
If Giorgetto Giorgi finds that baroque works lament the lack of unity of action but imitate the primacy given to love in medieval texts, Anne Berthelot sees works such as Perceforest surviving only in the tales of Perrault, while Eglal Henein argues that Honore d'Urfe both parodies medieval romance and reinvents the Middle Ages in his own baroque image.
The Inordinate Eye, New World Baroque and Latin American Fiction.
Caroline Copeland's torso retains a regal calm as her turns and jumps race to Handel's music in the New York Baroque Dance Company's production of Terpsicore.
Bangor's popular Baroque ensemble will perform a mixture of 17th and 18th century music at Powis Hall in the university's main arts building, starting at 8pm on Saturday.
The Canadian record company Analekta has for the past decade been making some of the best Baroque recordings on the market, thanks in large measure to the talents of Jeanne Lamon and her superb Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra, so you would expect any collection of Baroque music from Analekta to feature Lamon's group prominently.
In his book The Fold: Leibniz and the Baroque (1988), Gilles Deleuze showed how, beginning with the Baroque, European thought abandoned the straight path of classical reason and developed more and more in folds, similar to the visible folds of the human brain.
THOUSAND OAKS - The Music Department at California Lutheran University will sponsor an evening of German baroque music performed by Ensemble Bella Musica at 4 p.
Read that trilogy--Quicksilver, The Confusion, and The System of the World, collectively called The Baroque Cycle--and you'll have the uncanny sense that you're reading some new kind of science fiction.
Johann Sebastian Bach And The Art Of Baroque Music (1931798222) considers the achievements of a man born into a family of professional musicians, who left home at the age of ten in search of a life which would allow him to write his beloved music.
Its cathedral and numerous Baroque churches and monasteries are among the finest in Bavaria.
John's Church on 31st Street, is hosting its second annual "August Tea at the Plaza" fundraiser on Thursday, August 12th at The Plaza Hotel, and will commence with a formal reception in the hotel's Baroque Suite and Louvre.
5 Sharon Isbin Plays Baroque Favorites for Guitar (Warner Classics) Nothing adds romance to chilly baroque tunes like this out musician's warm guitar.