baroqueness


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ba·roque

 (bə-rōk′)
adj.
1. also Baroque Of, relating to, or characteristic of a style in art and architecture developed in Europe from the early 17th to mid-18th century, emphasizing dramatic, often strained effect and typified by bold, curving forms, elaborate ornamentation, and overall balance of disparate parts.
2. also Baroque Music Of, relating to, or characteristic of a style of composition that flourished in Europe from about 1600 to 1750, marked by expressive dissonance and elaborate ornamentation.
3. Extravagant, complex, or bizarre, especially in ornamentation: "the baroque, encoded language of post-structural legal and literary theory" (Wendy Kaminer).
4. Irregular in shape: baroque pearls.
n. also Baroque
The baroque style or period in art, architecture, or music.

[French, from Italian barocco, imperfect pearl, and from Portuguese barroco.]

ba·roque′ly adv.
ba·roque′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baroqueness - elaborate and extensive ornamentation in decorative art and architecture that flourished in Europe in the 17th centurybaroqueness - elaborate and extensive ornamentation in decorative art and architecture that flourished in Europe in the 17th century
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
References in periodicals archive ?
This is odd, since although the murder of Marinus Sch6berl was notable for the baroqueness of the cruelty involved, it was by no means an isolated incident with respect to the anti-Jewish motives involved.
Aesthetically, Aylett owes more to MTV than he does to literary tradition: his experimental prose pieces resemble the digitally manipulated hallucinations we see on our screens, and their sheer Baroqueness makes a kindred spirit such as Robert Coover look like a Victorian.
Q: Let's then turn to the baroqueness (or neo-baroqueness) in your style, which you mentioned a while ago.