barricade


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bar·ri·cade

 (băr′ĭ-kād′, băr′ĭ-kād′)
n.
1.
a. A usually improvised structure set up, as across a route of access, to obstruct the passage of an enemy or opponent. See Synonyms at bulwark.
b. A usually temporary structure set up to restrict or control the movement of people or conveyances: stood behind the barricades watching the parade.
2. Something that serves as an obstacle; a barrier: "One of those wild minds who saw bridges where others saw barricades" (Patricia Monaghan).
tr.v. bar·ri·cad·ed, bar·ri·cad·ing, bar·ri·cades
1. To close off or block with a barricade.
2. To shut (oneself) in by means of a barricade, as for protection or privacy.

[French, from barrique, barrel, from Old Provençal barrica, from Vulgar Latin *barrīca; see embargo.]

bar′ri·cad′er n.

barricade

(ˌbærɪˈkeɪd; ˈbærɪˌkeɪd)
n
a barrier for defence, esp one erected hastily, as during street fighting
vb (tr)
1. to erect a barricade across (an entrance, passageway, etc) or at points of access to (a room, district of a town, etc): they barricaded the door.
2. (usually passive) to obstruct; block: his mind was barricaded against new ideas.
[C17: from Old French, from barriquer to barricade, from barrique a barrel, from Spanish barrica, from barril barrel]
ˈbarriˌcader n

bar•ri•cade

(ˈbær ɪˌkeɪd, ˌbær ɪˈkeɪd)

n., v. -cad•ed, -cad•ing. n.
1. a defensive barrier hastily constructed, as in a street, to stop an enemy.
2. any barrier that obstructs passage.
v.t.
3. to obstruct or block with a barricade.
4. to shut in and defend with or as if with a barricade.
[1585–95; < French, <barrique barrel]

barricade

barricade


Past participle: barricaded
Gerund: barricading

Imperative
barricade
barricade
Present
I barricade
you barricade
he/she/it barricades
we barricade
you barricade
they barricade
Preterite
I barricaded
you barricaded
he/she/it barricaded
we barricaded
you barricaded
they barricaded
Present Continuous
I am barricading
you are barricading
he/she/it is barricading
we are barricading
you are barricading
they are barricading
Present Perfect
I have barricaded
you have barricaded
he/she/it has barricaded
we have barricaded
you have barricaded
they have barricaded
Past Continuous
I was barricading
you were barricading
he/she/it was barricading
we were barricading
you were barricading
they were barricading
Past Perfect
I had barricaded
you had barricaded
he/she/it had barricaded
we had barricaded
you had barricaded
they had barricaded
Future
I will barricade
you will barricade
he/she/it will barricade
we will barricade
you will barricade
they will barricade
Future Perfect
I will have barricaded
you will have barricaded
he/she/it will have barricaded
we will have barricaded
you will have barricaded
they will have barricaded
Future Continuous
I will be barricading
you will be barricading
he/she/it will be barricading
we will be barricading
you will be barricading
they will be barricading
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been barricading
you have been barricading
he/she/it has been barricading
we have been barricading
you have been barricading
they have been barricading
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been barricading
you will have been barricading
he/she/it will have been barricading
we will have been barricading
you will have been barricading
they will have been barricading
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been barricading
you had been barricading
he/she/it had been barricading
we had been barricading
you had been barricading
they had been barricading
Conditional
I would barricade
you would barricade
he/she/it would barricade
we would barricade
you would barricade
they would barricade
Past Conditional
I would have barricaded
you would have barricaded
he/she/it would have barricaded
we would have barricaded
you would have barricaded
they would have barricaded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barricade - a barrier set up by police to stop traffic on a street or road in order to catch a fugitive or inspect traffic etc.barricade - a barrier set up by police to stop traffic on a street or road in order to catch a fugitive or inspect traffic etc.
barrier - a structure or object that impedes free movement
2.barricade - a barrier (usually thrown up hastily) to impede the advance of an enemybarricade - a barrier (usually thrown up hastily) to impede the advance of an enemy; "they stormed the barricade"
barrier - a structure or object that impedes free movement
Verb1.barricade - render unsuitable for passagebarricade - render unsuitable for passage; "block the way"; "barricade the streets"; "stop the busy road"
obturate, occlude, close up, impede, obstruct, jam, block - block passage through; "obstruct the path"
block off, close off, shut off - block off the passage through; "We shut off the valve"
close - bar access to; "Due to the accident, the road had to be closed for several hours"
obstruct, block - shut out from view or get in the way so as to hide from sight; "The thick curtain blocked the action on the stage"; "The trees obstruct my view of the mountains"
2.barricade - prevent access to by barricadingbarricade - prevent access to by barricading; "The street where the President lives is always barricaded"
obturate, occlude, close up, impede, obstruct, jam, block - block passage through; "obstruct the path"
3.barricade - block off with barricades
obturate, occlude, close up, impede, obstruct, jam, block - block passage through; "obstruct the path"

barricade

noun
1. barrier, wall, railing, fence, blockade, obstruction, rampart, fortification, bulwark, palisade, stockade Large areas of the city have been closed off by barricades.
verb
1. bar, block, defend, secure, lock, bolt, blockade, fortify, fasten, latch, obstruct The doors had been barricaded.
2. shut, lock, confine, enclose, imprison, pound, wall off or up, impound The students have barricaded themselves into the building.

barricade

noun
Something that impedes or prevents entry or passage:
Translations
مِتْراس، حاجِزيَحْجِز، يَسُد بِمِتْراس
barikádazabarikádovat
barrikadebarrikadere
barikád
òvergirîa, lokavegartálmi
barikadaužbarikaduoti
aizbarikādētbarikāde
barikádazabarikádovať
barikadazabarikadirati
barikatbarikat kurmkengel

barricade

[ˌbærɪˈkeɪd]
A. Nbarricada f
B. VTcerrar con barricadas
to barricade o.s. in a househacerse fuerte en una casa

barricade

[ˌbærɪˈkeɪd]
nbarricade f
to set up a barricade → ériger des barricades, dresser des barricades
vt (= block) → barricader
to barricade o.s. in → se barricader

barricade

nBarrikade f

barricade

[ˌbærɪˈkeɪd]
1. nbarricata
2. vtbarricare

barricade

(bӕriˈkeid) noun
a barrier put up to block a street etc. There were barricades keeping back the crowds.
verb
to block something (eg a street) with a barricade.
References in classic literature ?
This repulsive pillow was her especial property, being used as a weapon of defense, a barricade, or a stern preventive of too much slumber.
But Steelkilt and his desperadoes were too much for them all; they succeeded in gaining the forecastle deck, where, hastily slewing about three or four large casks in a line with the windlass, these sea-Parisians entrenched themselves behind the barricade.
he said, for he had come across more than one such barricade in his night rambles after things to eat.
It was his intention to hail her from beyond the palisade, giving her the feeling of security which he imagined the stout barricade would afford.
In an empty hut I feasted on some specked and half-decayed fruit; and then after I had propped some branches and sticks about the opening, and placed myself with my face towards it and my hand upon my revolver, the exhaustion of the last thirty hours claimed its own, and I fell into a light slumber, hoping that the flimsy barricade I had erected would cause sufficient noise in its removal to save me from surprise.
The third proceeded to barricade the doors and windows, then returned, and the three united in stifling the cries of terror incited by the sight of these preparations, and then dragged Assunta feet foremost towards the brazier, expecting to wring from her an avowal of where her supposed treasure was secreted.
In a short time there was quite a barricade along the regimental fronts.
Behind the barricade there may be much that is noble and heroic.
We passed up the stair, unlocked the door, followed on down a passage, and found ourselves in front of the barricade which Miss Hunter had described.
When, following the course of our brook, we at last reached our glade and saw the thorny barricade of our camp, we thought that our adventures were at an end.
Startled at finding it locked he rattled the handle violently; then he reflected that Mattie was alone and that it was natural she should barricade herself at nightfall.
When Jane and Esmeralda found themselves safely behind the cabin door the Negress's first thought was to barricade the portal from the inside.