barroom


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bar·room

 (bär′ro͞om′, -ro͝om′)
n.
A room or building in which alcoholic beverages are sold at a bar.

barroom

(ˈbɑːˌruːm; -ˌrʊm)
n
US a room or building where alcoholic drinks are served over a counter

bar•room

(ˈbɑrˌrum, -ˌrʊm)

n.
an establishment or room with a bar for the serving of alcoholic beverages.
[1790–1800, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barroom - a room or establishment where alcoholic drinks are served over a counterbarroom - a room or establishment where alcoholic drinks are served over a counter; "he drowned his sorrows in whiskey at the bar"
barrelhouse, honky-tonk - a cheap drinking and dancing establishment
cocktail lounge - a barroom in a hotel or restaurant where cocktails are served
gin mill, pothouse, pub, public house, taphouse, saloon - tavern consisting of a building with a bar and public rooms; often provides light meals
room - an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"
sawdust saloon - a saloon whose floor is covered with sawdust
speakeasy - (during prohibition) an illegal barroom
Translations

barroom

bar-room [ˈbɑːrruːm]
n (US)bar m
modif
barroom brawl → bagarre f (de bar) (dans un bar), rixe f (dans un bar)
barroom pianist → pianiste mf de bar
References in classic literature ?
In the barroom he found assembled quite a miscellaneous company, whom stress of weather had driven to harbor, and the place presented the usual scenery of such reunions.
He looked round the barroom with rather an anxious air, and, retreating with his valuables to the warmest corner, disposed them under his chair, sat down, and looked rather apprehensively up at the worthy whose heels illustrated the end of the mantel-piece, who was spitting from right to left, with a courage and energy rather alarming to gentlemen of weak nerves and particular habits.
Let the student go thither in December, sit down with the teamsters at their meals, share their evening merriment, and repose with them at night when every bed has its three occupants, and parlor, barroom, and kitchen are strewn with slumberers around the fire.
Several hailings passed from one party to the other, but in a language which none of the company in the barroom could understand, and presently they heard the window closed, and a great noise overhead, as if all the furniture were pulled and hauled about the room.
This was the first suspicious occurrence that Tarzan had ever witnessed in connection with Gernois' actions, but he was positive that the men had left the barroom solely because Gernois had caught Tarzan's eyes upon them; then there was the persistent impression of familiarity about the stranger to further augment the ape-man's belief that here at length was something which would bear watching.
A moment later Tarzan entered the barroom, but the men had left, nor did he see aught of them in the street beyond, though he found a pretext to ride to various shops before he set out after the column which had now considerable start of him.
He had been in quite a number of miscellaneous fights, and in some general barroom rows that had become known to the police.
Some days afterward, finding him sitting alone in his barroom, I cautiously approached the subject, when, greatly to my relief, the habitual austerity of his expression visibly softened into something that I took for condescension.
Every one chattered, argued, discussed, disputed, applauded, from the gentleman lounging upon the barroom settee with his tumbler of sherry-cobbler before him down to the waterman who got drunk upon his "knock-me-down" in the dingy taverns of Fell Point.
They passed through the narrow entrance and into the stone-flagged barroom, where the men laid down their stretcher.
She had even been in Klondike, ten years before, in a half-dozen flashing sentences picturing the fur-clad, be-moccasined miners sowing the barroom floors with thousands of dollars' worth of gold dust.
the butt of his friends, the chartered oracle of the barrooms, even in whose wretched vanity there was always the haunting suspicion that he was despised and scorned; he, who had dared so much in speech, and achieved so little in fact