barycentre


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Related to barycentre: Barycentric coordinates

barycentre

(ˈbærɪˌsɛntə)
n
(Celestial Objects) a centre of mass, esp of the earth-moon system or the solar system
[C20: from Greek barus heavy + centre]
ˌbaryˈcentric adj
References in periodicals archive ?
Another eureka moment for me was considering the barycentre of any two-body system--which I never have before.
2, where whole chains segments of macromolecular could overcome interaction and entanglement between each other and occur relative displacement of macromolecular barycentre, in that way the macroscopical flow will happen under shear or stretching stresses and the polymer can fill in the mold cavities.
2] Z axis moment of inertia a, m Front axle to the barycentre distance b, m Rear axle to the barycentre distance Front wheel [B.
The shift in the barycentre of production and automotive markets towards emerging countries has already happened, given the impressive growth of car use in China in particular.
Values of hierarchical barycentre coefficients of different dimensions of oral health quality Tabela 1.
Assume that the barycentre of robot is in its geometric center and the ground is plane, so the height coordinate [y.
Root and crown of the tree extend far below the tree barycentre and cause an anchoring effect for the tree on land as well as in shallow waters.
In general, the rounded square shape has the axis of the handle vertical through the pot body, perpendicular and pointing to the horizontal plane; and a round shape has the axis of the handle perpendicular to the generatrix of the pot body, pointing to the barycentre on the body.
Et non pas d'un chef de gouvernement qui reste scotche au barycentre des forces politiques et syndicales, pour satisfaire tout le monde [beaucoup moins que] sauf l'avenir de la Tunisie [beaucoup plus grand que] sous pretexte de preserver la paix sociale.
4), where the barycentre of the EPN network is located.
This refers to the International Celestial Reference System, which is the standard celestial coordinate system centered at the barycentre of the Solar System, with axes that are fixed with respect to objects in far-reaches of the cosmos.
Sometimes larger planets can pull the Barycentre out of the mass of the Sun, which means the Earth (and everything else, including the Sun) is just orbiting around empty space.