based


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base 1

 (bās)
n.
1. The lowest or bottom part: the base of a cliff; the base of a lamp.
2. Biology
a. The part of a plant or animal organ that is nearest to its point of attachment.
b. The point of attachment of such an organ.
3.
a. A supporting part or layer; a foundation: a skyscraper built on a base of solid rock.
b. A basic or underlying element; infrastructure: the nation's industrial base.
4. The fundamental principle or underlying concept of a system or theory; a basis.
5. A fundamental ingredient; a chief constituent: a paint with an oil base.
6. The fact, observation, or premise from which a reasoning process is begun.
7.
a. Games A starting point, safety area, or goal.
b. Baseball Any one of the four corners of an infield, marked by a bag or plate, that must be touched by a runner before a run can be scored.
8.
a. A center of organization, supply, or activity; a headquarters.
b. The portion of a social organization, especially a political party, consisting of the most dedicated or motivated members.
9.
a. A fortified center of operations.
b. A supply center for a large force of military personnel.
10. A facial cosmetic used to even out the complexion or provide a surface for other makeup; a foundation.
11. Architecture The lowest part of a structure, such as a wall, considered as a separate unit: the base of a column.
12. Heraldry The lower part of a shield.
13. Linguistics A morpheme or morphemes regarded as a form to which affixes or other bases may be added.
14. Mathematics
a. The side or face of a geometric figure to which an altitude is or is thought to be drawn.
b. The number that is raised to various powers to generate the principal counting units of a number system. The base of the decimal system, for example, is 10.
c. The number raised to the logarithm of a designated number in order to produce that designated number; the number at which a chosen logarithmic scale has the value 1.
15. A line used as a reference for measurement or computations.
16. Chemistry
a. Any of a class of compounds whose aqueous solutions are characterized by a bitter taste, a slippery feel, the ability to turn litmus blue, and the ability to react with acids to form salts.
b. A substance that yields hydroxide ions when dissolved in water.
c. A substance that can act as a proton acceptor.
d. A substance that can donate a pair of electrons to form a covalent bond.
17. Electronics
a. The region in a transistor between the emitter and the collector.
b. The electrode attached to this region.
18. One of the nitrogen-containing purines (adenine and guanine) or pyrimidines (cytosine, thymine, and uracil) that occurs attached to the sugar component of DNA or RNA.
adj.
1. Forming or serving as a base: a base layer of soil.
2. Situated at or near the base or bottom: a base camp for the mountain climbers.
3. Chemistry Of, relating to, or containing a base.
tr.v. based, bas·ing, bas·es
1. To form or provide a base for: based the new company in Portland.
2. To find a basis for; establish: based her conclusions on the report; a film based on a best-selling novel.
3. To assign to a base; station: troops based in the Middle East.
Idiom:
off base
Badly mistaken.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin basis, from Greek; see gwā- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: base1, basis, foundation, ground1, groundwork
These nouns all pertain to what underlies and supports. Base is used broadly in both literal and figurative contexts: the wide base of the pyramid; a party seeking to expand its power base.
Basis is used in a nonphysical sense: "Healthy scepticism is the basis of all accurate observation" (Arthur Conan Doyle).
Foundation often stresses firmness of support for something of relative magnitude: "Our flagrant disregard for the law attacks the foundation of this society" (Peter D. Relic).
Ground is used figuratively, especially in the plural, to mean a justifiable reason: grounds for divorce.
Groundwork usually has the sense of a necessary preliminary: "It [the Universal Declaration of Human Rights] has laid the groundwork for the world's war crimes tribunals" (Hillary Rodham Clinton).

base 2

 (bās)
adj. bas·er, bas·est
1. Having or showing a lack of decency; contemptible, mean-spirited, or selfish.
2.
a. Being a metal that is of little value.
b. Containing such metals: base coins.
3. Archaic Of low birth, rank, or position.
4. Obsolete Short in stature.
n. Obsolete
A bass singer or voice.

[Middle English bas, low, from Old French, from Medieval Latin bassus.]

base′ly adv.
base′ness n.
Synonyms: base2, low1, abject, ignoble, mean2, sordid
These adjectives mean lacking in dignity or falling short of the standards befitting humans. Base suggests a contemptible, mean-spirited, or selfish lack of human decency: "that liberal obedience, without which your army would be a base rabble" (Edmund Burke).
Something low violates standards of morality, ethics, or propriety: low cunning; a low trick. Abject means degrading or miserable: abject failure; abject poverty. Ignoble means lacking noble qualities, such as elevated moral character: "For my part I think it a less evil that some criminals should escape than that the government should play an ignoble part" (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.).
Mean suggests pettiness, spite, or stinginess: "Never ascribe to an opponent motives meaner than your own" (J.M. Barrie).
Sordid suggests foul, repulsive degradation: "It is through art ... that we can shield ourselves from the sordid perils of actual existence" (Oscar Wilde).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.based - having a base; "firmly based ice"
supported - held up or having the weight borne especially from below; "supported joints in a railroad track have ties directly under the rail ends"
2.based - having a base of operations (often used as a combining form)based - having a base of operations (often used as a combining form); "a locally based business"; "an Atlanta-based company"; "carrier-based planes"
settled - established in a desired position or place; not moving about; "nomads...absorbed among the settled people"; "settled areas"; "I don't feel entirely settled here"; "the advent of settled civilization"
Translations
založený
beliggende i
perustuva
zasnovan
・・・に基づく
...을 바탕으로 한
baserad
ซึ่งเป็นรากฐาน
dựa trên

based

[ˈbeɪst] adj (= located) → situé(e)
locally based [organization] → local(e); [service] → local(e); [person] → local(e)
see also -based

based

قَائِمٌ عَلَى založený beliggende i beruhend (auf) βασισμένος basado perustuva basé zasnovan basato ・・・に基づく ...을 바탕으로 한 gebaseerd basert oparty baseado основанный baserad ซึ่งเป็นรากฐาน dayanan dựa trên 基于
References in classic literature ?
The theory that has been most generally received is, that atolls are based on submarine craters; but when we consider the form and size of some, the number, proximity, and relative positions of others, this idea loses its plausible character: thus Suadiva atoll is
But we shall immediately see, that in this, as well as in the crater-theory, a most important consideration has been overlooked, namely, on what have the reef-building corals, which cannot live at a great depth, based their massive structures?
Again, on what have the reef-building corals, which cannot live at great depths, based their encircling structures?
I will not enter on many more details; but I must remark that the curious structure of the northern Maldiva atolls receives (taking into consideration the free entrance of the sea through their broken margins) a simple explanation in the upward and outward growth of the corals, originally based both on small detached reefs in their lagoons, such as occur in common atolls, and on broken portions of the linear marginal reef, such as bounds every atoll of the ordinary form.
The text is based on translations from the Grimms' Kinder und Hausmarchen by
Rakes, those male Magdalenes, have a secret feeling of innocence similar to that which female Magdalenes have, based on the same hope of forgiveness.
This authoritative text is reprinted from the Library of America edition of Novels by Edith Wharton, and is based on the sixth impression of the first edition, which incorporates the last set of extensive revisions that are obviously authorial.
This test question was based on an item in the "Thinking Creatively with Words" (Torrance, 1992) the verbal version of the popular Torrance test of creative thinking, still in popular use (Kim, 2006).
In addition, the drafters recognized that, for practical purposes, sales should be sourced based on where the taxable property would be used.
As head of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, Towey advocated for greater public funding of religion-based social services and for allowing those religious charities to hire and fire employees based on their religious beliefs.
representative from Monterey who served as President Clinton's chief of staff during the previous round of base closures, said the commission's decisions are supposed to be based only on the facts, but that isn't always the case.
Each school sets its own application deadlines for campus-based funds, based on the Level of funding it receives and the anticipated financial needs of their students.