basoche


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basoche

(bəˈsɒʃ)
n
1. (Theatre) a guild of medieval Parisian lawyers, granted the privilege of performing religious plays and known for abusing this privilege by performing comic plays instead
2. (Law) a guild of medieval Parisian lawyers, granted the privilege of performing religious plays and known for abusing this privilege by performing comic plays instead
References in periodicals archive ?
Com base no detalhado exame dos calembours disseminados na obra, Guiraud sugeriu que o autor empirico pudesse ter sido um membro da basoche, cujas relacoes com o teatro burlesco da epoca sao conhecidas (KOOPMANS; VERHUYCK, 1987, p.
While the auspices for the Semur play are unknown, and we cannot link the drama to any one such fraternity, the prominence of mock legal discourse combined with particular parodie action shows the influence of basoche culture on the play's reviser.
Tous deux adresses aux "amis," ils mettent en place une nouvelle sociabilite intellectuelle, partagee par la generation des etudiants qui ont connu les guerres et assistent au debat religieux instaure par Erasme, qui explorent la rencontre en langues vernaculaires et langues classiques, qui se fient a la Basoche, rient aux aventures de Pantagruel, et croient en un avenir moderne et savant tout a la fois.
These examples from early modern France allow for an interesting comparison to the types rioters, who were members and former members of the Juvenile Advocates' Society, which seems to parallel the Basoche.
Beam's focus is primarily the plays and farces performed by university students and the less exalted members of the law courts such as clerks, ushers, and notaries, collectively referred to as the basoche.
The Growing Cost of Laughter: Basoche and Student Performance" examines decreasing opportunities for liberal farce performance with the advent of the Wars of Religion.
Chapters three and seven are particularly concerned with the relatively under discussed form of student drama, in their respective investigations of mid-sixteenth-century performances by the Basoche and by university students, and of Jesuit theatre as a seventeenth-century forum for Christian civility and absolutism.
The chapter recounting the clashes between the Bordelais basoche (young lawyers-in-training and lesser officials associated with the Parlement of Bordeaux) through their Confraternity of Saint-Yves and the Protestant-inclined students of that city's College de Guyenne is fascinating.
En 1461 le Feu Dauphin, devenu le Roi de France Louis XI, sous le conseil de Charles d'Orleans et a l'occasion d'un voyage solennel a Meung, a elargi de prison le poete en rupture de ban Francois Villon, en depit de l'Eveque Inquisiteur, mais a la satisfaction du Quartier Latin et de la Basoche.
In his 1970 book Le Testament de Villon ou le gai savoir de la Basoche, the French philologist Pierre Guiraud argued convincingly that, far from being autobiographical, both The Legacy and The Testament were coded satires based on an elaborate verbal system and were in fact what he termed "judicial farces.
The following two chapters discuss the theatre of Basoche and a select few plays from the fifteenth century where the above-mentioned elements can be found.