bastard

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bas·tard

 (băs′tərd)
n.
1. Offensive A person born to parents not married to each other.
2. Slang
a. A person considered to be mean or contemptible.
b. A person, especially one considered to be unfortunate: "crumbling shacks where some poor bastard had tried to raise a family" (Tom Clancy).
3. Something that is of irregular, inferior, or dubious origin.
adj.
1. Offensive Born to parents not married to each other.
2. Not genuine; spurious: a bastard style of architecture.
3. Resembling a known kind or species but not truly such.

[Middle English, from Old French, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Old Frisian bōst, marriage.]

bas′tard·ly adj.

bastard

(ˈbɑːstəd; ˈbæs-)
n
1. informal offensive an obnoxious or despicable person
2. informal often jocular a person, esp a man: lucky bastard.
3. informal something extremely difficult or unpleasant: that job is a real bastard.
4. old-fashioned or offensive a person born of unmarried parents; an illegitimate baby, child, or adult
5. something irregular, abnormal, or inferior
6. (Breeds) a hybrid, esp an accidental or inferior one
adj (prenominal)
7. old-fashioned or offensive illegitimate by birth
8. irregular, abnormal, or inferior in shape, size, or appearance
9. resembling a specified thing, but not actually being such: a bastard cedar.
10. counterfeit; spurious
[C13: from Old French bastart, perhaps from bast in the phrase fils de bast son of the packsaddle (that is, of an unlawful union and not the marriage bed), from Medieval Latin bastum packsaddle, of uncertain origin]
ˈbastardly adj

bas•tard

(ˈbæs tərd)

n.
1. a person born of unmarried parents; an illegitimate child.
2. a mean, despicable person.
3. something spurious or inferior.
adj.
4. illegitimate in birth.
5. made or done in imitation; spurious; false: bastard emeralds.
6. of abnormal or irregular shape or size.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French; Medieval Latin bastardus, probably < Germanic *bāst-]
bas′tard•ly, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bastard - insulting terms of address for people who are stupid or irritating or ridiculous
dirty word, vulgarism, obscenity, smut, filth - an offensive or indecent word or phrase
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
2.bastard - the illegitimate offspring of unmarried parentsbastard - the illegitimate offspring of unmarried parents
offspring, progeny, issue - the immediate descendants of a person; "she was the mother of many offspring"; "he died without issue"
3.bastard - derogatory term for a variation that is not genuinebastard - derogatory term for a variation that is not genuine; something irregular or inferior or of dubious origin; "the architecture was a kind of bastard suggesting Gothic but not true Gothic"
variation - an artifact that deviates from a norm or standard; "he patented a variation on the sandal"
Adj.1.bastard - fraudulent; having a misleading appearance
counterfeit, imitative - not genuine; imitating something superior; "counterfeit emotion"; "counterfeit money"; "counterfeit works of art"; "a counterfeit prince"

bastard

noun
1. (Informal, offensive) rogue, criminal, sharper, fraud, cheat, devil, crook (informal), villain, charlatan, rascal, profligate, scoundrel, con man (informal), scally (Northwest English dialect), fraudster, wretch (slang), swindler, libertine, knave (archaic), ne'er-do-well, reprobate, scumbag, miscreant, scamp, malefactor, blackguard, evildoer, grifter (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), rapscallion, caitiff (archaic), skelm (S. African) I don't trust the bastard.
2. illegitimate child, love child, by-blow (archaic), natural child, child born out of wedlock, whoreson (archaic) He was a bastard, disowned by his father.
3. (Informal, offensive) nuisance, pain, bore, drag (informal), bother, headache (informal), pest, irritation, gall, annoyance, aggravation, pain in the neck (informal), pain in the arse (taboo informal), vexation Life can be a real bastard at times.

bastard

adjective
Born to parents who are not married to each other:
Translations
، إبْنُ سِفاح، إبْنُ زِنىوَلَد غَيْر شَرْعي
nemanželské dítěnemanželský
bastardbastard-uægte
ahvfeikjobuneegerpede
äpäräjäljitelmäkiusankappalekusipäälehtolapsi
bâtardfils de putesalopardfils de putain
fattyú
óskilgetiî barn, bastarîuróskilgetinn
nesantuokinispavainikis
ārlaulības-ārlaulības bērnsbastards
nemanželské dieťa
nezakonski otrokničvrednež
bastardskitstövel
gayrimeşru çocukpiç

bastard

[ˈbɑːstəd]
A. ADJ (= illegitimate) → bastardo
B. N
1. (= illegitimate child) → bastardo/a m/f
2.cabrón/ona m/f, hijo/a m/f de puta, hijo/a m/f de la chingada (Mex)
you bastard!¡cabrón!
you old bastard!¡hijoputa!
that silly bastardese idiota
this job is a real bastardeste trabajo es muy jodido

bastard

[ˈbɑːstərd] n
(= illegitimate child) → enfant naturel(le) m/f, bâtard(e) m/f bastard son, bastard daughter
(term of abuse)salaud m
You bastard! → Salaud!
You stupid bastard!
BUT Espèce de con!.bastard daughter nbâtarde f

bastard

n
(lit)uneheliches Kind, Bastard m (old); (fig: = hybrid) → Bastard m, → Kreuzung f
(sl: = person) → Scheißkerl m (inf); stupid bastardArschloch nt (vulg); poor bastardarmes Schwein (inf), → armer Hund (inf)
(sl: = difficult job etc) this question is a real bastarddiese Frage ist wirklich hundsgemein (inf); a bastard of a job etceine Scheißarbeit etc (inf)
adj
(lit) childunehelich
(fig: = hybrid) dog, plantBastard-; languageMisch-

bastard

[ˈbɑːstəd]
1. nbastardo/a (fam!, pej) → figlio di puttana (fam!)
2. adj (child) → illegittimo/a

bastard

(ˈbaːstəd) noun
a child born of parents not married to each other.
adjective
a bastard son.

bastard

n. bastardo-a; hijo o hija ilegítimo-a.
References in classic literature ?
Whence he argued the legality of punishing the crime of the parent on the bastard.
29) Lisa Zunshine does show in her masterful study Bastards and Foundlings both that "the concept of bastardy was anything but monolithic" in the eighteenth century, (30) and that Fielding seeks to demythologize the bastard figure by denying any of the cultural fantasies, good or bad, (31) about Tom and the many other bastards who proliferate in the novel.
Maple Razsa, Bastards of Utopia: living radical politics after socialism Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2015; 291 pp; ISBN 9780253015839 with:
The season has spent a lot of time setting up the epic clash between Houses Stark and Bolton, and Ramsay Bolton will take center stage of the aptly titled&nbsp;"Battle of the Bastards.
Mind you, I'm glad we've seen the back of 'bilious attacks' and 'egg-bound' - although old-fashioned bastards (those born outside of wedlock) as opposed to modern bastards (rotters) seem to be having a bit of a moment.
Exploring how violence and diaspora shape youths who fight the status quo with their own misguided violence, Bastards promises a new thread in Balkan literature.
You bastards know exactly what you are doing, you just don't care.
This is the point of Claire Denis's Bastards, a film in which everyone loses except the richest bastard on the block, industrialist Edouard Laporte.
From a tangle of Roman law, custom, royal edicts, and magistrates' decisions, Matthew Gerber identifies a two-fold shift in the treatment of bastards.
Journalist Kevin Maurer traveled with such a team in Afghanistan observing their operations, documented in vivid detail in GENTLEMAN BASTARDS and highly recommended for military and general lending libraries alike.
The position of illegitimates there, as he briefly demonstrates, was more liberal than that of their counterparts in the Holy Roman Empire where in many states bastards could not hold public office or even be a full-time member of a guild.
Paul seem to draw analogies between bastards and those who rejected the message of the gospels (John 8:31-59; Galatians 4:21-31).