batrachotoxin


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Related to batrachotoxin: saxitoxin

ba·tra·cho·tox·in

 (bə-trăk′ə-tŏk′sĭn, băt′rə-kō-)
n.
A steroid alkaloid derived from skin secretions of South American poison-dart frogs of the genus Phyllobates. It is one of the most potent venoms known.

[Greek batrakhos, frog + toxin.]
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Summary: Batrachotoxin, isolated from frogs belonging to the genus Phyllobates, is a very potent neurotoxin and a steroidal alkaloid that has been found to block the Na+ channels in nerves and muscles resulting in arrhythmias or cardiac arrest leading to death.
Keywords: Batrachotoxin, radical mediated reaction, nBu3SnH, AIBN, alkynyl stannanes.
Batrachotoxin alkaloids from passerine birds: a second toxic bird genus (Ifrita ko-waldi) from New Guinea.
Congratulations to John Chapman for submitting batrachotoxin from the poison dart frog, Phyllobates terribili, as the poison used in the October 2009 "Lily Robinson and an Assassin's Tracks.
Simply put, the patches I left for him were embedded with a highly lethal concentration of batrachotoxin from the poison-dart frog Phyllobates terribilis.
Daly and Myers found that they could use the presence of one alkaloid, batrachotoxin, to show that several species had a common ancestor.
Birds in the genera Pitohui and Ifrita carry batrachotoxins, the same compounds found in some of the poison frogs of the Americas.
Members of Central and South American rainforest tribes hunt with darts dipped in batrachotoxins from dart-poison frog skin.
Batrachotoxins are highly unpleasant and frequently lethal.
At the time, the alkaloids, called batrachotoxins, had been found in only one other source in nature, the Phyllobates poison dart frogs on the other side of the world--in Colombia and Panama.