beacon


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bea·con

 (bē′kən)
n.
1.
a. A signal fire, especially one used to warn of an enemy's approach.
b. A signaling or guiding device that emits light, such as a lighthouse.
c. A radio transmitter that emits a characteristic guidance signal for aircraft.
d. A signaling device that emits a repeating sound; a pinger.
2. A source of guidance or inspiration: a beacon of hope.
tr. & intr.v. bea·coned, bea·con·ing, bea·cons
To provide with or signal as a beacon.

[Middle English beken, from Old English bēacen; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

beacon

(ˈbiːkən)
n
1. a signal fire or light on a hill, tower, etc, esp one used formerly as a warning of invasion
2. (Physical Geography) a hill on which such fires were lit
3. (Nautical Terms) a lighthouse, signalling buoy, etc, used to warn or guide ships in dangerous waters
4. (Telecommunications) short for radio beacon
5. (Aeronautics) a radio or other signal marking a flight course in air navigation
6. (Civil Engineering) short for Belisha beacon
7. a person or thing that serves as a guide, inspiration, or warning
8. (Civil Engineering) a stone set by a surveyor to mark a corner or line of a site boundary, etc
vb
9. to guide or warn
10. (intr) to shine
[Old English beacen sign; related to Old Frisian bāken, Old Saxon bōcan, Old High German bouhhan]

bea•con

(ˈbi kən)
n.
1. a guiding or warning signal, as a light or fire, esp. one in an elevated position.
2. a tower or hill used for such purposes.
3. a lighthouse, signal buoy, etc., on a shore or at sea to warn and guide vessels.
4.
b. a radar device transmitting a pulse from a fixed location as an aid to navigation.
5. a person or thing that warns, guides, etc.
v.t.
6. to serve as a beacon to.
7. to furnish or mark with beacons.
v.i.
8. to serve or shine as a beacon.
[before 950; Middle English beken, Old English bēacen sign, signal, c. Old Frisian bāken, Old High German bouhhan]

beacon

See: crash locator beacon; fan marker beacon; localizer; meaconing; personal locator beacon; radio beacon; submarine locator acoustic beacon; Z marker beacon.

beacon


Past participle: beaconed
Gerund: beaconing

Imperative
beacon
beacon
Present
I beacon
you beacon
he/she/it beacons
we beacon
you beacon
they beacon
Preterite
I beaconed
you beaconed
he/she/it beaconed
we beaconed
you beaconed
they beaconed
Present Continuous
I am beaconing
you are beaconing
he/she/it is beaconing
we are beaconing
you are beaconing
they are beaconing
Present Perfect
I have beaconed
you have beaconed
he/she/it has beaconed
we have beaconed
you have beaconed
they have beaconed
Past Continuous
I was beaconing
you were beaconing
he/she/it was beaconing
we were beaconing
you were beaconing
they were beaconing
Past Perfect
I had beaconed
you had beaconed
he/she/it had beaconed
we had beaconed
you had beaconed
they had beaconed
Future
I will beacon
you will beacon
he/she/it will beacon
we will beacon
you will beacon
they will beacon
Future Perfect
I will have beaconed
you will have beaconed
he/she/it will have beaconed
we will have beaconed
you will have beaconed
they will have beaconed
Future Continuous
I will be beaconing
you will be beaconing
he/she/it will be beaconing
we will be beaconing
you will be beaconing
they will be beaconing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been beaconing
you have been beaconing
he/she/it has been beaconing
we have been beaconing
you have been beaconing
they have been beaconing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been beaconing
you will have been beaconing
he/she/it will have been beaconing
we will have been beaconing
you will have been beaconing
they will have been beaconing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been beaconing
you had been beaconing
he/she/it had been beaconing
we had been beaconing
you had been beaconing
they had been beaconing
Conditional
I would beacon
you would beacon
he/she/it would beacon
we would beacon
you would beacon
they would beacon
Past Conditional
I would have beaconed
you would have beaconed
he/she/it would have beaconed
we would have beaconed
you would have beaconed
they would have beaconed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.beacon - a fire (usually on a hill or tower) that can be seen from a distancebeacon - a fire (usually on a hill or tower) that can be seen from a distance
visual signal - a signal that involves visual communication
signal fire, signal light - a fire set as a signal
2.beacon - a radio station that broadcasts a directional signal for navigational purposesbeacon - a radio station that broadcasts a directional signal for navigational purposes
radio station - station for the production and transmission of AM or FM radio broadcasts
3.beacon - a tower with a light that gives warning of shoals to passing shipsbeacon - a tower with a light that gives warning of shoals to passing ships
tower - a structure taller than its diameter; can stand alone or be attached to a larger building
Verb1.beacon - shine like a beaconbeacon - shine like a beacon      
beam, shine - emit light; be bright, as of the sun or a light; "The sun shone bright that day"; "The fire beamed on their faces"
2.beacon - guide with a beaconbeacon - guide with a beacon      
lead, guide, take, conduct, direct - take somebody somewhere; "We lead him to our chief"; "can you take me to the main entrance?"; "He conducted us to the palace"

beacon

noun signal, sign, rocket, beam, flare, lighthouse, bonfire, watchtower, smoke signal, pharos, signal fire The full moon beams like a beacon in the clear sky.
Translations
مُرْشِد لاسِلكيمَنارَه، فَنار
naváděcí stanicesignální oheňsignální věžstrážné světlo
fyrlysradiofyrsignallys
loistomaamerkkimerimerkkimerkkitulivaroitin
משואה
jelzõfényjelzőtűzrádiós irányadó
radíóvitiviti
radijo švyturyssignalinė šviesa
bākabojaradiobākasignāluguns
rádiový majákvýstražné svetlo
feneruyarı işaretiyol ve konum gösteren radyo işareti

beacon

[ˈbiːkən]
A. N
1. (in port) → faro m; (on aerodrome) → baliza f, aerofaro m (Rad) → radiofaro m; (= fire) → almenara f
2. (= hill) → hacho m
B. CPD beacon light Nluz f de faro

beacon

[ˈbiːkən] n
(= lighthouse) → fanal m
to be a beacon of hope (= encouraging) → être porteur d'espoir
(= marker) → balise f
(also radio beacon) → radiophare mbeacon school nécole f pilote

beacon

n (= fire, light)Leuchtfeuer nt; (= radio beacon)Funkfeuer nt; (= one of a series of lights, radio beacons)Bake f

beacon

[ˈbiːkn] n (fire) → fuoco di segnalazione; (lighthouse) → faro, fanale m; (radio beacon) → radiofaro; (marker) → segnale m

beacon

(ˈbiːkən) noun
1. a type of light, fire etc that warns of danger, eg the light in a lighthouse.
2. a radio station or transmitter that sends out signals to guide shipping or aircraft.
References in classic literature ?
To lay down on the rocks, a stick, or any straight thing to guide my hand, exactly in the line of the beacon and the flagstaff.
She was obliged to pass between the point of the jetty, surmounted by a beacon just lighted, and a rock which jutted out.
The hatches of the saloon were open, and, as the beacon light of the Nautilus was not in action, a dim obscurity reigned in the midst of the waters.
I assume he followed the land and passed through what is at present known as Margate Roads, groping his careful way along the hidden sandbanks, whose every tail and spit has its beacon or buoy nowadays.
He is Squire Gordon, of Birtwick Park, the other side the Beacon Hills," said James.
A beacon fire blazed through the night on the same place, but the captain observed that all these signals might be treacherous.
Just one of earth's many millions of homes, Anne--girl--but ours-- OURS--our beacon in `a naughty world.
At seven o'clock in the evening all was ready, and at ten minutes past seven they doubled the lighthouse just as the beacon was kindled.
On the edge of the river I could faintly make out the only two black things in all the prospect that seemed to be standing upright; one of these was the beacon by which the sailors steered - like an unhooped cask upon a pole - an ugly thing when you were near it; the other a gibbet, with some chains hanging to it which had once held a pirate.
Every night they talked over what they had seen, and their own dull, uneventful life took a warmth and a coloring from their neighbors as a blank wall reflects a beacon fire.
The people of the Westerns wrought then a mound over the sea: it was high and broad, easy to behold by the sailors over the waves, and during ten days they built up the beacon of the war- renowned, the mightiest of fires.
The air was filled with the brands of the beacon, and a heavy darkness succeeded, not unlike that of the appalling instant, when the last rays of the sun are excluded by the intervening mass of the moon.