beak


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beak
top to bottom: black skimmer, pileated woodpecker, and American goldfinch

beak

 (bēk)
n.
1.
a. The bill of a bird, especially one that is strong and curved, such as that of a hawk or a finch.
b. A similar structure in other animals, such as turtles, insects, or fish.
2. A usually firm, tapering tip on certain plant structures, such as some seeds and fruits.
3. A beaklike structure or part, as:
a. The spout of a pitcher.
b. A metal or metal-clad ram projecting from the bow of an ancient warship.
4. Informal The human nose.
5. Chiefly British Slang
a. A schoolmaster.
b. A judge.

[Middle English bek, from Old French bec, from Latin beccus, of Celtic origin.]

beaked (bēkt) adj.

beak

(biːk)
n
1. (Zoology) the projecting jaws of a bird, covered with a horny sheath; bill
2. (Zoology) any beaklike mouthpart in other animals, such as turtles
3. slang a person's nose, esp one that is large, pointed, or hooked
4. any projecting part, such as the pouring lip of a bucket
5. (Architecture) architect the upper surface of a cornice, which slopes out to throw off water
6. (Chemistry) chem the part of a still or retort through which vapour passes to the condenser
7. (Nautical Terms) nautical another word for ram5
[C13: from Old French bec, from Latin beccus, of Gaulish origin]
beaked adj
ˈbeakless adj
ˈbeakˌlike adj
ˈbeaky adj

beak

(biːk)
n
a Brit slang word for judge, magistrate, headmaster, schoolmaster
[C19: originally thieves' jargon]

beak

(bik)

n.
1. the bill of a bird.
2. any horny or stiff projecting mouthpart of an animal, fish, or insect.
3. anything beaklike or ending in a point, as the spout of a pitcher.
4. Slang. a person's nose.
5. a projection from the bow of an ancient warship, used to ram enemy vessels.
6. a narrow projecting molding resembling a bird's beak, forming a drip for shedding rainwater, as on a cornice.
[1175–1225; Middle English bec < Old French < Latin beccus < Gaulish]
beaked (bikt, ˈbi kɪd) adj.

beak

(bēk)
1. The bill of a bird.
2. A similar, often horny part forming the mouth of other animals, such as turtles and octopuses.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.beak - beaklike mouth of animals other than birds (e.g., turtles)beak - beaklike mouth of animals other than birds (e.g., turtles)
mouth - the externally visible part of the oral cavity on the face and the system of organs surrounding the opening; "she wiped lipstick from her mouth"
2.beak - horny projecting mouth of a birdbeak - horny projecting mouth of a bird  
bird - warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings
cere - the fleshy, waxy covering at the base of the upper beak of some birds
mouth - the externally visible part of the oral cavity on the face and the system of organs surrounding the opening; "she wiped lipstick from her mouth"
3.beak - a beaklike, tapering tip on certain plant structures
tip - the extreme end of something; especially something pointed
4.beak - informal terms for the nosebeak - informal terms for the nose    
nose, olfactory organ - the organ of smell and entrance to the respiratory tract; the prominent part of the face of man or other mammals; "he has a cold in the nose"
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
Verb1.beak - hit lightly with a picking motionbeak - hit lightly with a picking motion  
strike - deliver a sharp blow, as with the hand, fist, or weapon; "The teacher struck the child"; "the opponent refused to strike"; "The boxer struck the attacker dead"

beak

noun
1. bill, nib, neb (archaic or dialect), mandible a black bird with a yellow beak
2. (Slang) nose, snout, hooter (slang), snitch (slang), conk (slang), neb (archaic or dialect), proboscis, schnozzle (slang, chiefly U.S.) his sharp, aristocratic beak
3. (Brit. informal) magistrate, justice, sheriff The beak told him he'd go down if he did anything like it again.

beak

noun
1. The horny projection forming a bird's jaws:
2. Informal. The structure on the human face that contains the nostrils and organs of smell and forms the beginning of the respiratory tract:
Informal: snoot.
Translations
مِنْقارمِنْقَار
клюнчовка
zobák
næb
beko
nokka
kljun
csőr
goggur
くちばし
부리
snapas
knābis
zobák
kljun
näbb
จงอยปากนก
дзьоб
mỏ chim

beak

[biːk] N
1. [of bird] → pico m (= nose) → napia f
2. (Naut) → rostro m
beak of landpromontorio m
3. (Brit) (= judge) → magistrado/a m/f

beak

[ˈbiːk] n [bird] → bec m

beak

n
(of bird, turtle)Schnabel m
(inf, of person) → Zinken m, → Rüssel m (inf)
(Brit inf: = judge etc) → Kadi m (inf); (Brit, Sch sl) → (Di)rex m (sl)

beak

[biːk] nbecco

beak

(biːk) noun
the hard, horny (usually pointed) part of a bird's mouth. The bird had a worm in its beak.

beak

مِنْقَار zobák næb Schnabel ράμφος pico nokka bec kljun becco くちばし 부리 snavel nebb dziób bico клюв näbb จงอยปากนก gaga mỏ chim 鸟嘴
References in classic literature ?
But,' he added, noticing Oliver's look of surprise, 'I suppose you don't know what a beak is, my flash com-pan-i-on.
The short-faced tumbler has a beak in outline almost like that of a finch; and the common tumbler has the singular and strictly inherited habit of flying at a great height in a compact flock, and tumbling in the air head over heels.
The largest beak in the genus Geospiza is shown in Fig.
asked the Falcon, bending his beak in deep reverence (for it must be known that, after all, the Lovely Maiden with Azure Hair was none other than a very kind Fairy who had lived, for more than a thousand years, in the vicinity of the forest).
The monster's mouth, a horned beak like a parrot's, opened and shut vertically.
He stooped, and dipped his beak in the pond; he thought it was his beak, but, of course, it was only his nose, and, therefore, very little water came up, and that not so refreshing as usual, so next he tried a puddle, and he fell flop into it.
A Crow, half-dead with thirst, came upon a Pitcher which had once been full of water; but when the Crow put its beak into the mouth of the Pitcher he found that only very little water was left in it, and that he could not reach far enough down to get at it.
Philip spent all day at the hospital and worked at home in the evening except when he went to the Athelnys' or to the tavern in Beak Street.
When the coop blew away from the ship I clung fast to this corner, with claws and beak, for I knew if I fell into the water I'd surely be drowned.
Its panelled front was in the likeness of a ship's bluff bows, and the Holy Bible rested on the projecting piece of scroll work, fashioned after a ship's fiddle-headed beak.
That is not done quite as you seem to think,' said the wolf; 'you must wait until the Queen comes,' Soon afterwards, the Queen arrived with some food in her beak, and the lord King came too, and they began to feed their young ones.
In front it was different, for his Ally Sloper-like head and neck had not a feather to them, and there was a horrible raw-skin pouch on his neck under his chin--a hold-all for the things his pick-axe beak might steal.