bear down


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bear 1

 (bâr)
v. bore (bôr), borne (bôrn) or born (bôrn), bear·ing, bears
v.tr.
1.
a. To carry (something) on one's person from one place to another: bore the suitcase to the station.
b. To move from one place to another while containing or supporting (something); convey or transport: a train bearing grain. See Synonyms at carry.
c. To cause to move by or with steady pressure; push: a boat borne along by the current.
d. To carry or hold in the mind over time; harbor: bear a grudge; bear ill will.
e. To have as a visible characteristic or attribute: a letter bearing his name.
2. To conduct (oneself) in a specified way: She bore herself with dignity.
3.
a. To hold up; support: This wall bears much of the weight of the roof.
b. To be accountable for; assume: bearing heavy responsibilities.
c. To have a tolerance for; endure: couldn't bear his lying; can't bear to see them leave. See Synonyms at endure.
d. To have grounds for; call for; warrant: This case bears investigation.
4.
a. To give birth to: bore six children.
b. To produce; yield: plants bearing fruit. See Synonyms at produce.
5. To offer; render: I will bear witness to the deed.
v.intr.
1. To yield fruit; produce: peach trees that bear every summer.
2. To have relevance or influence; apply: They studied how the relativity theory bears on the history of science.
3. To endure something with tolerance or patience: Bear with me while I explain what happened.
4.
a. To extend or proceed in a specified direction: The road bears to the right at the bottom of the hill.
b. To be directed or aimed in a certain direction or at a target: The guns were brought to bear upon the approaching fleet.
Phrasal Verbs:
bear down
1. To exert muscular pressure downward, as in giving birth to a baby.
2. To advance in a threatening manner: The ship bore down on our canoe.
3. To apply maximum effort and concentration: If you really bear down, you will finish the task.
bear out
To prove to be right or justified; confirm: The test results bear out our claims.
bear up
To withstand stress, difficulty, or attrition: The patient bore up well during the long illness.
Idioms:
bear a relation/relationship to
To have an association with or relevance to: That remark bears no relation to the matter at hand.
bear a resemblance/liking/similarity to
To be similar to; appear or function like.
bear down on
1. To move rapidly toward: The ship bore down on the abandoned vessel.
2. To affect in a harmful or adverse way: Financial pressures are bearing down on them.
bear fruit
To come to a satisfactory conclusion or to fruition.
bear in mind
To hold in one's mind; remember: Bear in mind that bridges freeze before roads.

[Middle English beren, from Old English beran; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Thanks to the vagaries of English spelling, bear has two past participles: born and borne. Traditionally, born is used only in passive constructions referring to birth: I was born in Chicago. For all other uses, including active constructions referring to birth, borne is the standard form: She has borne both her children at home. I have borne his insolence with the patience of a saint.

bear 2

 (bâr)
n.
1.
a. Any of various usually omnivorous mammals of the family Ursidae that have a shaggy coat and a short tail and walk with the entire lower surface of the foot touching the ground.
b. Any of various other animals, such as the koala, that resemble a true bear.
2. A large, clumsy, or ill-mannered person.
3.
a. One, such as an investor, that sells securities or commodities in expectation of falling prices.
b. A pessimist, especially regarding business conditions.
4. Slang Something that is difficult or unpleasant: The final exam was a bear.
5. Slang A highway patrol officer.
6. Slang A hairy, stocky gay man.
adj.
Characterized by falling prices: a bear market.

[Middle English bere, from Old English bera; see bher- in Indo-European roots. Sense 3, probably from the proverb to sell the bear's skin before catching the bear.]

bear down

vb (intr, adverb; often foll by on or upon)
1. to press or weigh down
2. to approach in a determined or threatening manner
3. (Nautical Terms) (of a vessel) to make an approach (to another vessel, obstacle, etc) from windward
4. (Gynaecology & Obstetrics) (of a woman during childbirth) to exert a voluntary muscular pressure to assist delivery
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.bear down - exert a force with a heavy weightbear down - exert a force with a heavy weight; "The snow bore down on the roof"
press - exert pressure or force to or upon; "He pressed down on the boards"; "press your thumb on this spot"
2.bear down - contract the abdominal muscles during childbirth to ease deliverybear down - contract the abdominal muscles during childbirth to ease delivery
constrict, compress, contract, compact, press, squeeze - squeeze or press together; "she compressed her lips"; "the spasm contracted the muscle"
3.bear down - to make a rush at or sudden attack upon, as in battlebear down - to make a rush at or sudden attack upon, as in battle; "he saw Jess charging at him with a pitchfork"
rush - attack suddenly
4.bear down - exert full strength; "The pitcher bore down"
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
fight, struggle, contend - be engaged in a fight; carry on a fight; "the tribesmen fought each other"; "Siblings are always fighting"; "Militant groups are contending for control of the country"
5.bear down - pay special attention to; "The lectures bore down on the political background"
accent, accentuate, emphasize, stress, punctuate, emphasise - to stress, single out as important; "Dr. Jones emphasizes exercise in addition to a change in diet"
6.bear down - exert a force or cause a strain upon; "This tax bears down on the lower middle class"
burden, saddle, charge - impose a task upon, assign a responsibility to; "He charged her with cleaning up all the files over the weekend"
Translations

w>bear down

vi
(= approach quickly)sich nahen (geh); (hawk etc)herabstoßen; to bear down on somebody/something (driver etc)auf jdn/etw zuhalten
(woman in labour)drücken
vt sepniederdrücken; he was borne down by povertyseine Armut lastete schwer auf ihm; to be borne down by the weight of …von der Last (gen)gebeugt sein
References in classic literature ?
Like the sword of Coeur De Lion, which always blazed in the front and thickest of the battle, Sam's palm-leaf was to be seen everywhere when there was the least danger that a horse could be caught; there he would bear down full tilt, shouting, "Now for it
As the Pawnees retired with the body, the Siouxes pressed upon their footsteps, and at length the whole of the latter broke out of the cover with a common yell, and threatened to bear down all opposition by sheer physical superiority.
But worse still: that he may bear down every argument in favor of these poems, he triumphantly drags forward a passage, in his abomination with which he expects the reader to sympathize.
I cannot guess,'' answered De Bracy, ``nor did I think there had been within the four seas that girth Britain a champion that could bear down these five knights in one day's jousting.
My chief war is against the clergy and barons of the land who bear down upon the poor.