bear upon


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Related to bear upon: To bear out
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.bear upon - have an effect upon; "Will the new rules affect me?"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
strike a blow - affect adversely; "The court ruling struck a blow at the old segregation laws"
repercuss - cause repercussions; have an unwanted effect
tell on - produce an effect or strain on somebody; "Each step told on his tired legs"
redound - have an effect for good or ill; "Her efforts will redound to the general good"
stimulate, excite - act as a stimulant; "The book stimulated her imagination"; "This play stimulates"
process, treat - subject to a process or treatment, with the aim of readying for some purpose, improving, or remedying a condition; "process cheese"; "process hair"; "treat the water so it can be drunk"; "treat the lawn with chemicals" ; "treat an oil spill"
hydrolise, hydrolize - make a compound react with water and undergo hydrolysis
tinge, color, colour, distort - affect as in thought or feeling; "My personal feelings color my judgment in this case"; "The sadness tinged his life"
endanger, peril, queer, scupper, expose - put in a dangerous, disadvantageous, or difficult position
hit, strike - affect or afflict suddenly, usually adversely; "We were hit by really bad weather"; "He was stricken with cancer when he was still a teenager"; "The earthquake struck at midnight"
subject - cause to experience or suffer or make liable or vulnerable to; "He subjected me to his awful poetry"; "The sergeant subjected the new recruits to many drills"; "People in Chernobyl were subjected to radiation"
discommode, disoblige, incommode, inconvenience, put out, trouble, bother - to cause inconvenience or discomfort to; "Sorry to trouble you, but..."
act upon, influence, work - have and exert influence or effect; "The artist's work influenced the young painter"; "She worked on her friends to support the political candidate"
slam-dunk - make a forceful move against; "the electronic travel market is slam-dunking traditional travel agencies"
References in classic literature ?
We were regularly christened, but afterward, in the very act of tattooing us with small distinguishing marks, the operator lost his reckoning; and although I bear upon my forearm a small "H" and he bore a "J," it is by no means certain that the letters ought not to have been transposed.
During that long interval Starbuck would ever be apt to fall into open relapses of rebellion against his captain's leadership, unless some ordinary, prudential, circumstantial influences were brought to bear upon him.
He knew very well that it is not the easiest thing in the world to bring influence to bear upon a great railway company.
It was in vain that I brought the batteries of common-sense to bear upon her whim.
But I am not afraid so long as I have my oil-can, and nothing can hurt the Scarecrow, while you bear upon your forehead the mark of the Good Witch's kiss, and that will protect you from harm.
John looked sedately and solemnly at his questioner until he had brought his mind to bear upon the whole of his observation, and then made answer, in a tone which seemed to imply that the moon was peculiarly his business and nobody else's:
It came to me straightway, under her contact, that, with plain heartiness, mere relieved anxiety at my appearance, she knew nothing whatever that could bear upon the incident I had there ready for her.
That was a rare point, Sydney, that you brought to bear upon the identification.
As a matter of fact it was about the only kind of logic that could be brought to bear upon my problem.
She guessed the recent ancestral discovery to bear upon it, but did not divine that it solely concerned herself.
said Aunt Plenty, bringing her spectacles to bear upon the pills, with a face so full of respectful interest that it was almost too much for Dr.
Impey Barbicane was a man of forty years of age, calm, cold, austere; of a singularly serious and self-contained demeanor, punctual as a chronometer, of imperturbable temper and immovable character; by no means chivalrous, yet adventurous withal, and always bringing practical ideas to bear upon the very rashest enterprises; an essentially New Englander, a Northern colonist, a descendant of the old anti-Stuart Roundheads, and the implacable enemy of the gentlemen of the South, those ancient cavaliers of the mother country.