bearable


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Related to bearable: inadvertently

bear·a·ble

 (bâr′ə-bəl)
adj.
Capable of being endured: bearable pain; a bearable schedule.

bear′a·bil′i·ty n.
bear′a·bly adv.

bearable

(ˈbɛərəbəl)
adj
endurable; tolerable
ˈbearably adv

bear•a•ble

(ˈbɛər ə bəl)

adj.
capable of being endured or tolerated.
[1540–50]
bear′a•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bearable - capable of being borne though unpleasantbearable - capable of being borne though unpleasant; "sufferable punishment"
tolerable - capable of being borne or endured; "the climate is at least tolerable"

bearable

bearable

adjective
Capable of being tolerated:
Translations
مُحتمل، مُمْكِن احْتِماله
snesitelný
tåleligudholdelig
òolanlegur
dayanılabilirtahammül edilebilir

bearable

[ˈbɛərəbl] ADJsoportable

bearable

[ˈbɛərəbəl] adjsupportable

bearable

bearable

[ˈbɛərəbl] adjsopportabile

bear1

(beə) past tense bore (boː) : past participle borne (boːn) verb
1. (usually with cannot, ~could not etc) to put up with or endure. I couldn't bear it if he left.
2. to be able to support. Will the table bear my weight?
3. (past participle in passive born (boːn) ) to produce (children). She has borne (him) several children; She was born on July 7.
4. to carry. He was borne shoulder-high after his victory.
5. to have. The cheque bore his signature.
6. to turn or fork. The road bears left here.
ˈbearable adjective
able to be endured.
ˈbearer noun
a person or thing that bears. the bearer of bad news.
ˈbearing noun
1. manner, way of standing etc. a military bearing.
2. (usually in plural. sometimes short for ˌball-ˈbearings) a part of a machine that has another part moving in or on it.
ˈbearings noun plural
location, place on a map etc; The island's bearings are 10 North, 24 West.
bear down on
1. to approach quickly and often threateningly. The angry teacher bore down on the child.
2. to exert pressure on. The weight is bearing down on my chest.
bear fruit
to produce fruit.
bear out
to support or confirm. This bears out what you said.
bear up
to keep up courage, strength etc (under strain). She's bearing up well after her shock.
bear with
to be patient with (someone). Bear with me for a minute, and you'll see what I mean.
find/get one's bearings
to find one's position with reference to eg a known landmark. If we can find this hill, I'll be able to get my bearings.
lose one's bearings
to become uncertain of one's position. He's confused me so much that I've lost my bearings completely.

bearable

a. soportable, tolerable.

bearable

adj soportable, tolerable
References in classic literature ?
I saw that I was just another Robinson Crusoe cast away on an uninhabited island, with no society but some more or less tame animals, and if I wanted to make life bearable I must do as he did -- invent, contrive, create, reorganize things; set brain and hand to work, and keep them busy.
Presently she stepped into the kitchen, and Sid, happy in his immunity, reached for the sugar-bowl -- a sort of glorying over Tom which was wellnigh un- bearable.
When they sat down on the grass with Captain curled at their feet, Soot solemnly listening on a tree and Nut and Shell nosing about close to them, it seemed to Mary that it would be scarcely bearable to leave such delightfulness, but when she began to tell her story somehow the look in Dickon's funny face gradually changed her mind.
Well, she succeeded somewhat, for, though sympathy can't alter facts, it can make them more bearable.
Besides, it would only have been necessary to go some yards beneath the waves to find a more bearable temperature.
There's nothing but what's bearable as long as a man can work," he said to himself; "the natur o' things doesn't change, though it seems as if one's own life was nothing but change.
Anything might be bearable rather than such reproaches.
It seemed to her that even the severest of pain could be wholly bearable if, in the midst of it, one felt cherished.
If only he would lose his temper with her now and then, she felt he would be bearable.
I can help to make your life here more bearable, but your fate is inevitable.
Philip acknowledged that from her point of view it would have been madness to marry him: only love could have made such poverty bearable, and she did not love him.
We can get a view from there and in our battery it is still bearable," said the adjutant.