beat down


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beat down

vb (adverb)
1. (Commerce) (tr) informal to force or persuade (a seller) to accept a lower price: I beat him down three pounds.
2. (intr) (of the sun) to shine intensely; be very hot
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.beat down - persuade the seller to accept a lower pricebeat down - persuade the seller to accept a lower price; "She beat the merchant down $100"
chaffer, haggle, higgle, huckster - wrangle (over a price, terms of an agreement, etc.); "Let's not haggle over a few dollars"
2.beat down - shine hardbeat down - shine hard; "The sun beat down on the hikers"
beam, shine - emit light; be bright, as of the sun or a light; "The sun shone bright that day"; "The fire beamed on their faces"
3.beat down - dislodge from a position; "She beat the dealer down to a much better price"
reposition, shift, dislodge - change place or direction; "Shift one's position"

beat

verb
1. To hit heavily and repeatedly with violent blows:
Informal: lambaste.
Slang: clobber.
Idiom: rain blows on.
2. To punish with blows or lashes:
Informal: trim.
Slang: lay into, lick.
3. To move (one's arms or wings, for example) up and down:
4. To indicate (time or rhythm), as with repeated gestures or sounds:
Idioms: keep time , mark time.
5. To make rhythmic contractions, sounds, or movements:
6. To shape, break, or flatten with repeated blows:
7. To mix rapidly to a frothy consistency:
8. To win a victory over, as in battle or a competition:
Informal: trim, whip.
Slang: ace, lick.
Idioms: carry the day, get the best of, get the better of, go someone one better.
9. Informal. To be greater or better than:
10. Slang. To make incapable of finding something to think, do, or say:
Informal: flummox, stick, stump, throw.
Idiom: put someone at a loss.
phrasal verb
beat down
To be projected with blinding intensity:
phrasal verb
beat off
To turn or drive away:
noun
1. A stroke or blow, especially one that produces a sound:
2. A periodic contraction or sound of something coursing:
3. The patterned, recurring alternation of contrasting elements, such as stressed and unstressed notes in music:
4. An area regularly covered, as by a policeman or reporter:
adjective
Informal. Extremely tired:
Informal: bushed, tuckered (out).
Slang: done in, fagged (out), pooped (out).
Idioms: all in, ready to drop.
Translations
يَخَفِّض السِّعْر بالمُساوَمَهيَضْغَط بالحَرارَه
pražitsmlouvat
brænde
lealkuszikletûz
prútta niîurvera heitur/brennandi
fiyat kırmak/indirmekkavurmaktepesine vurmak

w>beat down

vi (rain)herunterprasseln; (sun)herunterbrennen
vt sep
(= reduce) pricesherunterhandeln; oppositionkleinkriegen (inf); I managed to beat him down (on the price)ich konnte den Preis herunterhandeln; I beat him down to £20 for the chairich habe den Stuhl auf £ 20 heruntergehandelt
(= flatten) dooreinrennen; wheat, cropniederwerfen

beat

(biːt) past tense beat: past participle ˈbeaten verb
1. to strike or hit repeatedly. Beat the drum.
2. to win against. She beat me in a contest.
3. to mix thoroughly. to beat an egg.
4. to move in a regular rhythm. My heart is beating faster than usual.
5. to mark or indicate (musical time) with a baton etc. A conductor beats time for an orchestra.
noun
1. a regular stroke or its sound. I like the beat of that song.
2. a regular or usual course. a policeman's beat.
ˈbeater noun
ˈbeating noun
ˈbeaten adjective
1. overcome; defeated. the beaten team; He looked tired and beaten.
2. mixed thoroughly. beaten egg.
beat about the bush
to approach a subject in an indirect way, without coming to the point or making any decision.
beat down
1. (of the sun) to give out great heat. The sun's rays beat down on us.
2. to (force to) lower a price by bargaining. We beat the price down; We beat him down to a good price.
beat it
to go away. Beat it, or I'll hit you!; She told her little brother to beat it.
beat off
to succeed in overcoming or preventing. The old man beat off the youths who attacked him; He beat the attack off easily.
beat a (hasty) retreat
to go away in a hurry. The children beat a hasty retreat when he appeared.
beat up
to punch, kick or hit (a person) severely and repeatedly. He beat up an old lady.
off the beaten track
away from main roads, centres of population etc.
References in classic literature ?
tis in an hour like this, with soul beat down and held to knowledge, --as wild, untutored things are forced to feed --Oh, life
Not contented with tearing off all the wainscot and hangings, and splitting the doors to pieces, they beat down the partition walls; and although that alone cost them near two hours, they cut down the cupola or lanthorn, and they began to take the slate and boards from the roof, and were prevented only by the approaching daylight from a total demolition of the building.
Jones was a little staggered by the blow, which came somewhat unexpectedly; but presently recovering himself he also drew, and though he understood nothing of fencing, prest on so boldly upon Fitzpatrick, that he beat down his guard, and sheathed one half of his sword in the body of the said gentleman, who had no sooner received it than he stept backwards, dropped the point of his sword, and leaning upon it, cried, "I have satisfaction enough: I am a dead man.
The sun-baked streets seemed to give back the heat that had beat down on them during the day, and the passers-by dragged their feet along them wearily.
It beat down with such violence that the Victoria could not stay near the ground without danger.
The hot rays of the sun beat down vertically and a fresh soft wind played with the hair of the bared heads and with the ribbons decorating the icon.
Mamma never allows us to beat down workwomen, but wishes us to pay them well, and economize in some other way, if we must," said Emma Davenport, a quiet, bright-eyed girl, who was called "odd " among the young ladies, because she dressed simply, when her father was a millionaire.
As his hard knuck- les beat down into the frightened face of the school- master, his wrath became more and more terrible.
Here they encamped upon the ice among stiffened willows, where they were obliged to beat down and clear away the snow to procure pasturage for their horses.
Everybody praised the valor and magnanimity of Sir Launcelot; and as for me, I was perfectly amazed, that one man, all by himself, should have been able to beat down and capture such battalions of practiced fighters.