becket


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to becket: Thomas Becket

beck·et

 (bĕk′ĭt)
n. Nautical
A device, such as a looped rope, hook and eye, strap, or grommet, used to hold or fasten loose ropes, spars, or oars in position.

[Origin unknown.]

becket

(ˈbɛkɪt)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a clevis forming part of one end of a sheave, used for securing standing lines by means of a thimble
2. (Nautical Terms) a short line with a grommet or eye at one end and a knot at the other, used for securing spars or other gear in place
[C18: of unknown origin]

Becket

(ˈbɛkɪt)
n
(Biography) Saint Thomas à. 1118–70, English prelate; chancellor (1155–62) to Henry II; archbishop of Canterbury (1162–70): murdered following his opposition to Henry's attempts to control the clergy. Feast day: Dec 29 or July 7

beck•et

(ˈbɛk ɪt)

n.
a device, as a short rope with an eye at one end and a knot at the other, used to secure ropes, sails, etc.
[1760–70]

Beck•et

(ˈbɛk ɪt)

n.
Saint Thomas à, 1118?–70, archbishop of Canterbury: murdered because of his opposition to Henry II's policies toward the church.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.becket - (Roman Catholic Church) archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 to 1170Becket - (Roman Catholic Church) archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 to 1170; murdered following his opposition to Henry II's attempts to control the clergy (1118-1170)
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
2.becket - (nautical) a short line with an eye at one end and a knot at the other; used to secure loose items on a ship
sailing, seafaring, navigation - the work of a sailor
line - something (as a cord or rope) that is long and thin and flexible; "a washing line"
References in classic literature ?
For their prelates; when they are proud and great, there is also danger from them; as it was in the times of Anselmus, and Thomas Becket, Archbishops of Canterbury; who, with their croziers, did almost try it with the king's sword; and yet they had to deal with stout and haughty kings, William Rufus, Henry the First, and Henry the Second.
The white child's name was Thomas a Becket Driscoll, the other's name was Valet de Chambre: no surname--slaves hadn't the privilege.
De Bigot,'' he added to his seneschal, ``thou wilt word this our second summons so courteously, as to gratify the pride of these Saxons, and make it impossible for them again to refuse; although, by the bones of Becket, courtesy to them is casting pearls before swine.
On Friday, the bone will arrive in Rochester Cathedral, Kent, before ending its tour in Canterbury, where Becket was slain at his altar.
A fragment of bone belonging to the murdered archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, has returned to England from Hungary for the first time in 800 years.
For example, I discovered that Becket was a great friend of Henry II, who promoted him to Archbishop of Canterbury before the pair fell out.
All of this is happening because Becket responded to the oldest trick in the world--a seemingly abandoned crying baby.
Contract notice: BC-10291 Thomas Becket Catholic School Outsourced Catering.
Becket looks after Billy, his 7-year-old brother, who gets gripped by various all engulfing obsessions.
2) Accumulated upon this brief action, however, is a panoply of detail that entirely departs from the conventions of the mystery novel, most of which seems to suspend the inevitable death of Bishop Thomas Becket without actually creating the feeling of suspense.
Thomas a Becket | 1170: Thomas a Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, was murdered in his own cathedral by four knights, believing they were acting on Henry II's orders.
The Supreme Court recognized that Americans do not lose their religious freedom when they run a family business," said Windham, senior counsel at the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty and counsel for Hobby Lobby in this case, in a statement.