been


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

been

 (bĭn)
v.
Past participle of be.

been

(biːn; bɪn)
vb
the past participle of be1

be

(bi; unstressed bi, bɪ)

v. and auxiliary v., pres. sing. 1st pers. am, 2nd are, 3rd is, pres. pl. are; past sing. 1st pers. was, 2nd were, 3rd was, past pl. were; pres. subj. be; past subj. sing. 1st, 2nd, and 3rd pers. were; past subj. pl. were; past part. been; pres. part. be•ing. v.i.
1. to exist or live: Shakespeare's “To be or not to be” is the ultimate question.
2. to take place; occur: The wedding was last week.
3. to occupy a place or position: The book is on the table.
4. to continue or remain as before: Let things be.
5. to belong; attend; befall: May good fortune be with you.
6. (used as a copula to connect the subject with its predicate adjective, or predicate nominative, in order to describe, identify, or amplify the subject): He is tall. She is president.
7. (used as a copula to introduce or form interrogative or imperative sentences): Is that right? Be quiet!
auxiliary verb.
8. (used with the present participle of another verb to form progressive tenses): I am waiting. We were talking.
9. (used with the infinitive of the principal verb to indicate a command, arrangements, or future action): He is to see me today. You are not to leave before six.
10. (used with the past participle of another verb to form the passive voice): The date was fixed.
11. (used in archaic or literary constructions with some intransitive verbs to form perfect tenses): He is come.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English bēon; akin to Old Frisian, Old High German bim (I) am, Latin fuī (I) have been, Greek phýein to grow, become]
usage: See me.

Be


Chem. Symbol.
beryllium.

be-

a prefix with the original sense “about,” “around,” “all over,” hence having an intensive and often disparaging force; used as a verb formative (becloud; besiege), and often serving to form transitive verbs from intransitives or from nouns: belabor; befriend; belittle.
[Middle English, Old English, unstressed form of by1]

B.E.

1. Bachelor of Education.
2. Bachelor of Engineering.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Tom Willard had a passion for village politics and for years had been the leading Democrat in a strongly Republican community.
In the boyish figure she yearned to see something half forgotten that had once been a part of herself re- created.
She had been ill in bed for several days and her son had not come to visit her.
The fact that the conversation between Tom Willard and his son had been rather quiet and natural, as though an under- standing existed between them, maddened her.
For years she had been what is called "stage-struck" and had paraded through the streets with traveling men guests at her father's hotel, wearing loud clothes and urging them to tell her of life in the cities out of which they had come.
In her own mind the tall dark girl had been in those days much confused.
The box contained material for make- up and had been left with other things by a theatrical company that had once been stranded in Wines- burg.
The strength that had been as a miracle in her body left and she half reeled across the floor, clutching at the back of the chair in which she had spent so many long days staring out over the tin roofs into the main street of Winesburg.