begrudgery

begrudgery

(bɪˈɡrʌdʒərɪ)
n
(Sociology) informal Irish resentment of any person who has achieved success or wealth
References in periodicals archive ?
Far from being solidarity between workers there is now institutionalised begrudgery whenever it appears one group has managed to secure, or even attempt to secure, a raise.
I'm convinced that part of the reason why I was not a hit in Ireland was due to begrudgery," he said.
I feel no begrudgery against the man who stopped me.
This opprobrious identification often remained decades after their return to Ireland, as insinuations of failure in America often combined with the begrudgery of the initially spurned native society to deny full reacceptance into Irish society.
It is at best what the Irish call begrudgery, the need to pull down anything that is bigger than we are for the sake of our own sense of righteousness.
It's good to know that begrudgery is not the sole preserve of us here in Ireland.
Removed from the public eye, Liddell's detailed and straightforward account of Anglo-Irish cooperation clearly belies Churchill's condemnation of Irish neutrality as based on begrudgery or opportunism--an effect which almost certainly influenced the decision of successive postwar governments to continue to suppress the document.
Angela added: "Ireland has changed so much, even in the past couple of years, but at the heart we are still a nation of romantics, eternal optimists who protect ourselves with en cynicism often mistaken for begrudgery.
But what an interesting insight into British begrudgery of those regarded as wealthy, well-educated and intelligent has been thrown up.
But it was inevitable that their longevity - which includes four All-Ireland club titles since 1997 - would also lead to begrudgery and criticism.
There's a bit of begrudgery with some Irish people but when people try to knock me back it just gives me ammunition to go out there and prove them wrong.