behaviourism


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Related to behaviourism: Cognitivism

behaviourism

(bɪˈheɪvjəˌrɪzəm) or

behaviorism

n
1. (Psychology) a school of psychology that regards the objective observation of the behaviour of organisms (usually by means of automatic recording devices) as the only proper subject for study and that often refuses to postulate any intervening mechanisms between the stimulus and the response
2. (Philosophy) the doctrine that the mind has no separate existence but that statements about the mind and mental states can be analysed into statements about actual and potential behaviour. Compare materialism2 See also mind-body problem
beˈhaviourist, beˈhaviorist adj, n
beˌhaviourˈistic, beˌhaviorˈistic adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.behaviourism - an approach to psychology that emphasizes observable measurable behaviorbehaviourism - an approach to psychology that emphasizes observable measurable behavior
experimental psychology, psychonomics - the branch of psychology that uses experimental methods to study psychological issues
reflexology - the study of reflex action as it relates to the behavior of organisms
Translations

behaviourism

behaviorism (US) [bɪˈheɪvjərɪzəm] Nconductismo m, behaviorismo m

behaviourism

[bɪˈheɪvjərɪzəm] (British) behaviorism (US) nbehaviorisme m

behaviourism

, (US) behaviorism

behaviourism

behaviorism (Am) [bɪˈheɪvjərɪzm] ncomportamentismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Everyone will find something to enjoy, from Lisa McInerney's Bad Behaviourism, a candid testimony to jammy accomplishments or Claire Brunton's naked truth in When All You Need Is A Fan Heater.
Thus, given the behaviourist paradigm failure to account for complexities surrounding necessary and sufficient conditions for the occurrence of successful conditioning and learning, there has been a paradigm shift from behaviourism to cognitivism (McLaren and Mackintosh, 1989).
Moreover, it was discovered that pre-service teachers expressed opinions mainly about behaviourism and constructivism as teaching theories and recitation and discussion as teaching methods.
The psychological paradigms of behaviourism, North American psychiatry, and alternative self-help models further distract people from reality by defining stress, guilt, and malaise as unnecessary, undesirable states of being rather than as realistic reactions to the state of the world that requires action and engagement.
Part I tiffed as the Foundations, Developmental Issues and Assessment initiates a motivated novice into the understanding of behaviour therapy by explaining the basic concepts related to behaviourism.
In Part 1 of The Undiscovered Wittgenstein the first three chapters reiterate the readings of Wittgenstein as an advocate of empiricism, neutral monism, phenomenalism and behaviourism, but they provide little amplification, with the exception of some extra support for these claims.
Modern behaviourism has its origin in the work of Pavlov, Watson and Skinner.
His work led, in the early 20th century, to the foundation of behaviourism, and to the development of what its proponents called the 'scientific' study of human beings.
Boring, the functionalism and evolutionism characteristic of American psychology preceding the founding of behaviourism were "natural to the temper of America" and were but "different aspects of the same attitude towards human nature.
Bowlby notes acerbically on Barthes (one of the several OK, or KO, names adduced by virtually all contributors): 'Lacan meets behaviourism.
An alternative approach to the subject matter of psychology is taken by behaviour analysis, a set of practices informed by radical behaviourism, itself 'a philosophy of science concerned with the subject matter and methods of psychology' (Skinner, 1969, p.
3 propose a theoretical approach based on radical behaviourism for analysing sales interaction outcomes.