behaviourism


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Related to behaviourism: Cognitivism

behaviourism

(bɪˈheɪvjəˌrɪzəm) or

behaviorism

n
1. (Psychology) a school of psychology that regards the objective observation of the behaviour of organisms (usually by means of automatic recording devices) as the only proper subject for study and that often refuses to postulate any intervening mechanisms between the stimulus and the response
2. (Philosophy) the doctrine that the mind has no separate existence but that statements about the mind and mental states can be analysed into statements about actual and potential behaviour. Compare materialism2 See also mind-body problem
beˈhaviourist, beˈhaviorist adj, n
beˌhaviourˈistic, beˌhaviorˈistic adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.behaviourism - an approach to psychology that emphasizes observable measurable behaviorbehaviourism - an approach to psychology that emphasizes observable measurable behavior
experimental psychology, psychonomics - the branch of psychology that uses experimental methods to study psychological issues
reflexology - the study of reflex action as it relates to the behavior of organisms
Translations

behaviourism

behaviorism (US) [bɪˈheɪvjərɪzəm] Nconductismo m, behaviorismo m

behaviourism

[bɪˈheɪvjərɪzəm] (British) behaviorism (US) nbehaviorisme m

behaviourism

, (US) behaviorism

behaviourism

behaviorism (Am) [bɪˈheɪvjərɪzm] ncomportamentismo
References in periodicals archive ?
By looking directly at their brains and bypassing the constraints of behaviourism, MRIs can tell us about dogs' internal states.
Part I tiffed as the Foundations, Developmental Issues and Assessment initiates a motivated novice into the understanding of behaviour therapy by explaining the basic concepts related to behaviourism.
Starting with BF Skinner's ideas of behaviourism and James Taylor's structured list of behavioural descriptions, Merrill and Reid set out to explore how people behave in social situations.
In Part 1 of The Undiscovered Wittgenstein the first three chapters reiterate the readings of Wittgenstein as an advocate of empiricism, neutral monism, phenomenalism and behaviourism, but they provide little amplification, with the exception of some extra support for these claims.
Modern behaviourism has its origin in the work of Pavlov, Watson and Skinner.
Boring, the functionalism and evolutionism characteristic of American psychology preceding the founding of behaviourism were "natural to the temper of America" and were but "different aspects of the same attitude towards human nature.