belabour

(redirected from belabouring)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

be·la·bour

 (bĭ-lā′bər)
v. Chiefly British
Variant of belabor.

belabour

(bɪˈleɪbə) or

belabor

vb (tr)
1. to beat severely; thrash
2. to attack verbally; criticize harshly
3. an obsolete word for labour

belabour


Past participle: belaboured
Gerund: belabouring

Imperative
belabour
belabour
Present
I belabour
you belabour
he/she/it belabours
we belabour
you belabour
they belabour
Preterite
I belaboured
you belaboured
he/she/it belaboured
we belaboured
you belaboured
they belaboured
Present Continuous
I am belabouring
you are belabouring
he/she/it is belabouring
we are belabouring
you are belabouring
they are belabouring
Present Perfect
I have belaboured
you have belaboured
he/she/it has belaboured
we have belaboured
you have belaboured
they have belaboured
Past Continuous
I was belabouring
you were belabouring
he/she/it was belabouring
we were belabouring
you were belabouring
they were belabouring
Past Perfect
I had belaboured
you had belaboured
he/she/it had belaboured
we had belaboured
you had belaboured
they had belaboured
Future
I will belabour
you will belabour
he/she/it will belabour
we will belabour
you will belabour
they will belabour
Future Perfect
I will have belaboured
you will have belaboured
he/she/it will have belaboured
we will have belaboured
you will have belaboured
they will have belaboured
Future Continuous
I will be belabouring
you will be belabouring
he/she/it will be belabouring
we will be belabouring
you will be belabouring
they will be belabouring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been belabouring
you have been belabouring
he/she/it has been belabouring
we have been belabouring
you have been belabouring
they have been belabouring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been belabouring
you will have been belabouring
he/she/it will have been belabouring
we will have been belabouring
you will have been belabouring
they will have been belabouring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been belabouring
you had been belabouring
he/she/it had been belabouring
we had been belabouring
you had been belabouring
they had been belabouring
Conditional
I would belabour
you would belabour
he/she/it would belabour
we would belabour
you would belabour
they would belabour
Past Conditional
I would have belaboured
you would have belaboured
he/she/it would have belaboured
we would have belaboured
you would have belaboured
they would have belaboured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.belabour - to work at or to absurd lengthbelabour - to work at or to absurd length; "belabor the obvious"
work at, work on - to exert effort in order to do, make, or perform something; "the child worked at the multiplication table until she had it down cold"
2.belabour - beat soundlybelabour - beat soundly        
beat up, work over, beat - give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression; "Thugs beat him up when he walked down the street late at night"; "The teacher used to beat the students"
3.belabour - attack verbally with harsh criticismbelabour - attack verbally with harsh criticism; "She was belabored by her fellow students"
criticise, criticize, pick apart, knock - find fault with; express criticism of; point out real or perceived flaws; "The paper criticized the new movie"; "Don't knock the food--it's free"

belabour

verb
1. beat, hit, strike, knock, punch, belt (informal), whip, deck (slang), batter, thrash, pound, flog, clobber (slang), tonk (informal), cudgel, thwack, lambast(e), lay one on (slang), drub Men began to belabour his shoulders with sticks.
2. attack, blast, put down, criticize, have a go (at) (informal), censure, malign, berate, castigate, revile, vilify, flame (informal), tear into (informal), lay into (informal), flay, diss (slang, chiefly U.S.), go for the jugular, lambast(e), excoriate They have been belaboured on all sides for withdrawing from the cup.
3. dwell on, go on about, linger over, harp on about, over-elaborate, over-emphasize, tarry over I will not belabour the point.
Translations

belabour

belabor (US) [bɪˈleɪbəʳ] VT (o.f.) (= beat) → apalear (fig) (with insults) → atacar; (with questions) → asediar (with con)

belabour

[bɪˈleɪbər] (British) belabor (US) vt
(= labour) [+ point] → insister sur
(= pummel) → rouer de coups, rosser

belabour

, (US) belabor
vt
(= hit)einschlagen auf (+acc)
(fig, with insults etc) → überhäufen; (with questions) → beschießen, bearbeiten

belabour

belabor (Am) [bɪˈleɪbəʳ] vt (beat) → bastonare
to belabour with (fig) (questions) → tartassare di (insults) → bombardare di
References in classic literature ?
The barber cudgelled Sancho, and Sancho pommelled the barber; Don Luis gave one of his servants, who ventured to catch him by the arm to keep him from escaping, a cuff that bathed his teeth in blood; the Judge took his part; Don Fernando had got one of the officers down and was belabouring him heartily; the landlord raised his voice again calling for help for the Holy Brotherhood; so that the whole inn was nothing but cries, shouts, shrieks, confusion, terror, dismay, mishaps, sword-cuts, fisticuffs, cudgellings, kicks, and bloodshed; and in the midst of all this chaos, complication, and general entanglement, Don Quixote took it into his head that he had been plunged into the thick of the discord of Agramante's camp; and, in a voice that shook the inn like thunder, he cried out:
The Vice-Warden meanwhile had got hold of Uggug, and was belabouring him with his umbrella.
That," said the Fool, diligently belabouring the animal, "is what I'm trying to teach this beast - which has kicked me.
Jones presently leapt from his bed, where he found the master of the puppet-show belabouring the back and ribs of his poor Merry-Andrew, without either mercy or moderation.
Young Green and little Hall, commonly called Tadpole, from his great black head and thin legs, slept side by side far away by the door, and were for ever playing one another tricks, which usually ended, as on this morning, in open and violent collision; and now, unmindful of all order and authority, there they were, each hauling away at the other's bedclothes with one hand, and with the other, armed with a slipper, belabouring whatever portion of the body of his adversary came within reach.
Well, William Dobbin had for once forgotten the world, and was away with Sindbad the Sailor in the Valley of Diamonds, or with Prince Ahmed and the Fairy Peribanou in that delightful cavern where the Prince found her, and whither we should all like to make a tour; when shrill cries, as of a little fellow weeping, woke up his pleasant reverie; and looking up, he saw Cuff before him, belabouring a little boy.