belfry


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bel·fry

 (bĕl′frē)
n. pl. bel·fries
1. A bell tower, especially one attached to a building.
2. The part of a tower or steeple in which bells are hung.

[Middle English belfrei, from Old North French belfroi, alteration of Old French berfrei, berfroi; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

bel′fried adj.
Word History: The words bell and belfry seem obviously related, but in fact the bel- portion of belfry had nothing to do with bells until comparatively recently. Belfry goes back to a compound formed in the prehistoric common ancestor of the Germanic languages. It is generally agreed that the second part of this compound is the element *frij-, meaning "peace, safety." The first element is either *bergan, "to protect," which would yield a compound meaning "a defensive place of shelter," or *berg-, "a high place," which would yield a compound meaning "a high place of safety, tower." Whatever the meaning of the original Germanic source, its Old French descendant berfrei, which first meant "siege tower," came to mean "watchtower." Presumably because bells were used in these towers, the word was applied to bell towers as well. The Old North French alteration belfroi, which must have reminded Middle English speakers of their native word belle (our bell), entered Middle English with the sense "bell tower."

belfry

(ˈbɛlfrɪ)
n, pl -fries
1. (Architecture) the part of a tower or steeple in which bells are hung
2. (Architecture) a tower or steeple. Compare campanile
3. (Architecture) the timber framework inside a tower or steeple on which bells are hung
4. (Military) (formerly) a movable tower for attacking fortifications
[C13: from Old French berfrei, of Germanic origin; compare Middle High German bercfrit fortified tower, Medieval Latin berfredus tower]

bel•fry

(ˈbɛl fri)

n., pl. -fries.
1. a bell tower either attached to a church or other building or standing apart.
2. the part of a steeple or other structure in which a bell is hung.
3. a frame of timberwork that encloses a bell.
[1225–75; Middle English belfray, berfray < Old French < Frankish; compare Middle High German ber(c)frit siegetower]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.belfry - a bell towerbelfry - a bell tower; usually stands alone unattached to a building
bell tower - a tower that supports or shelters a bell
2.belfry - a room (often at the top of a tower) where bells are hungbelfry - a room (often at the top of a tower) where bells are hung
bell tower - a tower that supports or shelters a bell
room - an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"
Translations
قُبَّة جَرَس
zvonice
klokketårn
kellotorni
harangtorony
klukkuturn
varpinė
zvanu tornis
çan kulesi

belfry

[ˈbelfrɪ] Ncampanario m

belfry

[ˈbɛlfri] nbeffroi m

belfry

nGlockenstube f ? bat1

belfry

[ˈbɛlfrɪ] ncampanile m

belfry

(ˈbelfri) plural ˈbelfries noun
the part of a (church) tower in which bells are hung.
References in classic literature ?
Above the session-room of the Council is the steeple, and in the steeple is the belfry, where exists, and has existed time out of mind, the pride and wonder of the village -- the great clock of the borough of Vondervotteimittiss.
For as in landscape gardening, a spire, cupola, monument, or tower of some sort, is deemed almost indispensable to the completion of the scene; so no face can be physiognomically in keeping without the elevated open-work belfry of the nose.
Then, on the right and the left, to east and west, within that wall of the City, which was yet so contracted, rose the bell towers of its one and twenty churches, of every date, of every form, of every size, from the low and wormeaten belfry of Saint-Denis du Pas (
In fact, at the end of a few minutes the belfry of St.
At last, in the further edge of that town I saw a small funeral procession -- just a family and a few friends following a coffin -- no priest; a funeral without bell, book, or candle; there was a church there close at hand, but they passed it by weeping, and did not enter it; I glanced up at the belfry, and there hung the bell, shrouded in black, and its tongue tied back.
Far in the distance in that birch and fir forest to the right of the road, the cross and belfry of the Kolocha Monastery gleamed in the sun.
Indeed, the charge was mostly an ignorant misunderstanding of the love of solitude and secret prayer, and was founded on his being often found kneeling, not before the altar, but in peculiar places, in the crypts or gallery, or even in the belfry.
The ten liveried archers were variously disposed about the church to keep him company; two of them being locked in a tiny crypt, three in the belfry, "to ring us a wedding peal," as Robin said; and the others under quire seats or in the vestry.
Why, I'll wager I can go up into the belfry of the Accoules, and without staggering, too
I suppose the very poorest of these was the "Devil in the Belfry," but such as it was I followed it as closely as I could in the "Devil in the Smoke-Pipes"; I meant tobacco-pipes.
Inter they climbed the earthquake racked belfry, noting the hand-hewn timbers; and in the gallery, discovering the pure quality of their voices, Saxon, trembling at her own temerity, softly sang the opening bars of "Jesus Lover of My Soul.
Indeed the worthy housewife was of such a capricious nature, that she not only attained a higher pitch of genius than Macbeth, in respect of her ability to be wise, amazed, temperate and furious, loyal and neutral in an instant, but would sometimes ring the changes backwards and forwards on all possible moods and flights in one short quarter of an hour; performing, as it were, a kind of triple bob major on the peal of instruments in the female belfry, with a skilfulness and rapidity of execution that astonished all who heard her.