belfry


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bel·fry

 (bĕl′frē)
n. pl. bel·fries
1. A bell tower, especially one attached to a building.
2. The part of a tower or steeple in which bells are hung.

[Middle English belfrei, from Old North French belfroi, alteration of Old French berfrei, berfroi; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

bel′fried adj.
Word History: The words bell and belfry seem obviously related, but in fact the bel- portion of belfry had nothing to do with bells until comparatively recently. Belfry goes back to a compound formed in the prehistoric common ancestor of the Germanic languages. It is generally agreed that the second part of this compound is the element *frij-, meaning "peace, safety." The first element is either *bergan, "to protect," which would yield a compound meaning "a defensive place of shelter," or *berg-, "a high place," which would yield a compound meaning "a high place of safety, tower." Whatever the meaning of the original Germanic source, its Old French descendant berfrei, which first meant "siege tower," came to mean "watchtower." Presumably because bells were used in these towers, the word was applied to bell towers as well. The Old North French alteration belfroi, which must have reminded Middle English speakers of their native word belle (our bell), entered Middle English with the sense "bell tower."

belfry

(ˈbɛlfrɪ)
n, pl -fries
1. (Architecture) the part of a tower or steeple in which bells are hung
2. (Architecture) a tower or steeple. Compare campanile
3. (Architecture) the timber framework inside a tower or steeple on which bells are hung
4. (Military) (formerly) a movable tower for attacking fortifications
[C13: from Old French berfrei, of Germanic origin; compare Middle High German bercfrit fortified tower, Medieval Latin berfredus tower]

bel•fry

(ˈbɛl fri)

n., pl. -fries.
1. a bell tower either attached to a church or other building or standing apart.
2. the part of a steeple or other structure in which a bell is hung.
3. a frame of timberwork that encloses a bell.
[1225–75; Middle English belfray, berfray < Old French < Frankish; compare Middle High German ber(c)frit siegetower]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.belfry - a bell towerbelfry - a bell tower; usually stands alone unattached to a building
bell tower - a tower that supports or shelters a bell
2.belfry - a room (often at the top of a tower) where bells are hungbelfry - a room (often at the top of a tower) where bells are hung
bell tower - a tower that supports or shelters a bell
room - an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"
Translations
قُبَّة جَرَس
zvonice
klokketårn
kellotorni
harangtorony
klukkuturn
varpinė
zvanu tornis
çan kulesi

belfry

[ˈbelfrɪ] Ncampanario m

belfry

[ˈbɛlfri] nbeffroi m

belfry

nGlockenstube f ? bat1

belfry

[ˈbɛlfrɪ] ncampanile m

belfry

(ˈbelfri) plural ˈbelfries noun
the part of a (church) tower in which bells are hung.
References in classic literature ?
For as in landscape gardening, a spire, cupola, monument, or tower of some sort, is deemed almost indispensable to the completion of the scene; so no face can be physiognomically in keeping without the elevated open-work belfry of the nose.
At last, in the further edge of that town I saw a small funeral procession -- just a family and a few friends following a coffin -- no priest; a funeral without bell, book, or candle; there was a church there close at hand, but they passed it by weeping, and did not enter it; I glanced up at the belfry, and there hung the bell, shrouded in black, and its tongue tied back.
A belfry rose above the porch on four small pillars, within which hung the green and weatherbeaten bell, the feeble sounds of which had been some time before heard by the Black Knight.
I can tell you one day she posted herself on the top of the belfry of the village to call some labourers of theirs that were in a ploughed field of her father's, and though they were better than half a league off they heard her as well as if they were at the foot of the tower; and the best of her is that she is not a bit prudish, for she has plenty of affability, and jokes with everybody, and has a grin and a jest for everything.
The ten liveried archers were variously disposed about the church to keep him company; two of them being locked in a tiny crypt, three in the belfry, "to ring us a wedding peal," as Robin said; and the others under quire seats or in the vestry.
In fact, at the end of a few minutes the belfry of St.
Why, I'll wager I can go up into the belfry of the Accoules, and without staggering, too
exclaimed Richard, snapping his fingers; “Ben is right, and I—” He was stopped by the sound of a common ship-bell, that had been elevated to the belfry of the academy, which now announced, by its incessant ringing, that the hour for the appointed service had arrived.
One would mount thus to the belfry of the castle without being conscious of fatigue," said Raoul.
With the preamble embodied in his share of the foregoing fragment of dialogue, he paid our hero a long visit; as the two men sat with their heels on Newman's glowing hearth, they heard the small hours of the morning striking larger from a far-off belfry.
Above the session-room of the Council is the steeple, and in the steeple is the belfry, where exists, and has existed time out of mind, the pride and wonder of the village -- the great clock of the borough of Vondervotteimittiss.
Passing by the tower with her husband on the path to the gate she could feel the vibrant air humming round them from the louvred belfry in the circle of sound, and it matched the highly-charged mental atmosphere in which she was living.