bell curve


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bell curve

n.
The typically symmetrical curve of a normal distribution, resembling the profile of a bell. Also called bell-shaped curve, normal curve.

bell′ curve`


n.
a frequency distribution in statistics that resembles the outline of a bell when plotted on a graph. Also called bell-shaped curve.
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bell curve
graph showing the distribution of a set of test scores where the average grade was a C

bell curve

A symmetrical bell-shaped curve that represents the typical distribution and frequency of the values of a set of random data. It slopes downward from a point in the middle corresponding to the mean.
References in periodicals archive ?
That makes The Bell Curve even more disconcerting, for less discerning readers more easily may be lulled into drawing inaccurate conclusions, especially those who are seeking reinforcement of their own biases.
What's interesting is that the distribution of the R-Squared values for the stocks in the Universe is an inverted bell curve (or well curve) distribution.
I knew the number of men shorter than the bell curve exceeded 28 million; adding tall men doubled that number," explained Bova.
Scholars from the US and abroad whose fields are not cited argue that the familiar bell curve is applicable only to truly random events, and not human behavior or intelligence.
His bell curve to monitor growth or improvement is impractical.
On February 2, members of a group called Grassroots Organizing for Welfare Leadership (GROWL) disrupted a speech by The Bell Curve author Charles Murray at the "New World of Welfare" conference held in Washington, D.
Forster noted that much of the variation fell within a bell curve and became convinced that there were probably just two species.
Dumping the bell curve would have meant abandoning the use of econometrics in finance, and hence nullifying a vast body of published work.
Tucker finds that the rents in free market cities follow a standard bell curve, with a steep climb on the low-rent side of the curve and a long tail toward the "luxury' end of the market.
For example, many liberals wince at the biological determinism of The Bell Curve, and conservatives often justify welfare reform on the grounds that behavior is indeed responsive to external, government-controlled incentives.
According to the buyer, "If you look at the bell curve, the season opens in March, it peaks in July and August, and then we star wrapping up in september, but there is a nice bleep in December.
He argues that, contrary to Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray's assertions in The Bell Curve, large changes in African-Americans' achievement and income can result, and have resulted, from government action.