belladonna


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bel·la·don·na

 (bĕl′ə-dŏn′ə)
n.
1. A poisonous perennial herb (Atropa belladonna) native to Eurasia and northern Africa and naturalized in parts of North America, having nodding, purplish-brown, bell-shaped flowers and glossy black berries. Also called deadly nightshade.
2. An alkaloidal extract or tincture derived from this plant and used in medicine.

[Italian : bella, feminine of bello, beautiful (from Latin bellus; see deu- in Indo-European roots) + donna, lady; see Donna (the plant perhaps being so called because women of Italian courts during the Renaissance are said to have used the juice of belladonna berries to make their eyes more attractive by dilating their pupils) .]

belladonna

(ˌbɛləˈdɒnə)
n
1. (Plants) either of two alkaloid drugs, atropine or hyoscyamine, obtained from the leaves and roots of the deadly nightshade
2. (Plants) another name for deadly nightshade
[C16: from Italian, literally: beautiful lady; supposed to refer to its use by women as a cosmetic]

bel•la•don•na

(ˌbɛl əˈdɒn ə)

n.
1. Also called deadly nightshade. a poisonous plant, Atropa belladonna, of the nightshade family, having purplish red flowers and black berries.
[1590–1600; < Italian bella donna literally, fair lady]

bel·la·don·na

(bĕl′ə-dŏn′ə)
Any of several alkaloids produced by the herb known as deadly nightshade. The alkaloids are poisonous but are also used in medicine, for example to increase the heart rate and treat Parkinson's disease.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.belladonna - perennial Eurasian herb with reddish bell-shaped flowers and shining black berriesbelladonna - perennial Eurasian herb with reddish bell-shaped flowers and shining black berries; extensively grown in United States; roots and leaves yield atropine
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Atropa, genus Atropa - belladonna
2.belladonna - an alkaloidal extract or tincture of the poisonous belladonna plant that is used medicinally
atropine - a poisonous crystalline alkaloid extracted from the nightshade family; used as an antispasmodic and to dilate the eye pupil; also administered in large amounts as an antidote for organophosphate nerve agents or organophosphate insecticides
Translations

belladonna

[ˌbeləˈdɒnə]
A. N (Bot, Med) → belladona f
B. CPD belladonna lily Nazucena f rosa

belladonna

n (Bot) → Tollkirsche f, → Belladonna f; (Med) → Belladonin nt

belladonna

[ˈbɛləˈdɒnə] n (Bot, Med) → belladonna

bel·la·don·na

n. belladona, yerba medicinal cuyas hojas y raíces contienen atropina y alcaloides.

belladonna

n (bot) belladona
References in classic literature ?
He smiled then, and was kinder, but it was very sad, and I cried with them till he turned round all of a sudden, and told me to go home and take belladonna right away, or I'd have the fever.
I looked in Mother's book, and saw that it begins with headache, sore throat, and queer feelings like mine, so I did take some belladonna, and I feel better," said Beth, laying her cold hands on her hot forehead and trying to look well.
With opium, belladonna, brucaea, snake-wood, and the cherry-laurel, they put to sleep all who stand in their way.
Half the girls do it, either paint or powder, darken their lashes with burnt hair-pins, or take cologne on lumps of sugar or belladonna to make their eyes bright.
He was a greater Prince than any there, though there was a reigning Duke and a Royal Highness, with their princesses, and near his Lordship was seated the beautiful Countess of Belladonna, nee de Glandier, whose husband (the Count Paolo della Belladonna), so well known for his brilliant entomological collections, had been long absent on a mission to the Emperor of Morocco.
Madame de Belladonna made him a scene about you and fired off in one of her furies.
Here is my lord's carriage"--and seizing Becky's arm, he rushed down an alley of the garden as Lord Steyne's barouche, blazing with heraldic devices, came whirling along the avenue, borne by the almost priceless horses, and bearing Madame de Belladonna lolling on the cushions, dark, sulky, and blooming, a King Charles in her lap, a white parasol swaying over her head, and old Steyne stretched at her side with a livid face and ghastly eyes.
His will was a good deal disputed, and an attempt was made to force from Madame de Belladonna the celebrated jewel called the "Jew's- eye" diamond, which his lordship always wore on his forefinger, and which it was said that she removed from it after his lamented demise.
Well up in belladonna, opium, and poisons generally.
Produced by Anthrax with Carl Canedy, the 44-minute Spreading the Disease marked the first Anthrax album to feature singer Belladonna and bassist Frank Bello (joining drummer Benante and guitarists Dan Spitz & Scott Ian), and set into motion the core elements that would become the essence of Anthrax.
A good witch, Belladonna, falls in love with Arriman and attempts to become an evil witch.
Called Belladonna Jane (belladonna is another name for deadly nightshade), the label features a chilling beak-like medieval doctor's plague mask that would have been filled with aromatic herbs and was designed to safeguard the wearer from the putrid miasma thought to surround invalids.