belt


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Related to belt: Belt drive

belt

 (bĕlt)
n.
1.
a. A flexible band, as of leather or cloth, worn around the waist or over a shoulder to hold up clothing, secure tools or weapons, or serve as decoration.
b. Something resembling a belt, as a number of machine-gun rounds attached together in a strip.
2. An encircling route.
3. A seat belt or safety belt.
4. A continuous band or chain for transferring motion or power or conveying materials from one wheel or shaft to another.
5. A band of tough reinforcing material beneath the tread of a tire.
6. A usually bandlike geographic region that is distinctive in a specific respect. Often used in combination: "This is America's rural poverty belt" (Charles Kuralt).
7. A powerful blow; a wallop.
8. A drink of hard liquor.
tr.v. belt·ed, belt·ing, belts
1. To equip, hold up, or attach with a belt: belted my trousers; belted the sword to her waist.
2. To encircle or mark in the manner of a belt: The equator belts the earth.
3. To beat with a belt or strap.
4. To strike forcefully; hit.
5. To sing in a loud and forceful manner: belt out a song.
6. To swig (an alcoholic beverage).
Idioms:
below the belt
Not according to the rules; unfairly.
tighten (one's) belt
To begin to exercise thrift and frugality.
under (one's) belt
In one's possession or experience: "By his mid-teens, Liszt had three years of intensive concertizing under his belt" (Musical Heritage Review).

[Middle English, from Old English, ultimately from Latin balteus.]

belt

(bɛlt)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a band of cloth, leather, etc, worn, usually around the waist, to support clothing, carry tools, weapons, or ammunition, or as decoration
2. a narrow band, circle, or stripe, as of colour
3. an area, esp an elongated one, where a specific thing or specific conditions are found; zone: the town belt; a belt of high pressure.
4. a belt worn as a symbol of rank (as by a knight or an earl), or awarded as a prize (as in boxing or wrestling), or to mark particular expertise (as in judo or karate)
5. (Automotive Engineering) See seatbelt
6. (Mechanical Engineering) a band of flexible material between rotating shafts or pulleys to transfer motion or transmit goods: a fan belt; a conveyer belt.
7. (Mechanical Engineering) a beltcourse. See cordon4
8. informal a sharp blow, as with a bat or the fist
9. (Boxing) boxing below the waist, esp in the groin
10. informal in an unscrupulous or cowardly way
11. tighten one's belt to take measures to reduce expenditure
12. under one's belt
a. (of food or drink) in one's stomach
b. in one's possession
c. as part of one's experience: he had a linguistics degree under his belt.
vb
13. (tr) to fasten or attach with or as if with a belt
14. (tr) to hit with a belt
15. (tr) slang to give a sharp blow; punch
16. slang (often foll by: along) to move very fast, esp in a car: belting down the motorway.
17. (tr) rare to mark with belts, as of colour
18. (tr) rare to encircle; surround
[Old English, from Latin balteus]
ˈbelted n

belt

(bɛlt)
n.
1. a band of flexible material, as leather or cord, for encircling the waist.
2. any encircling or transverse band, strip, or stripe.
3. an often extended region having distinctive properties or characteristics: a belt of cotton plantations.
4. an endless flexible band passing about two or more pulleys, used to transmit motion or to convey materials and objects.
5. a road, railroad, or the like encircling an urban center to handle peripheral traffic.
6. Slang.
a. a hard blow; punch.
b. a swallow of liquor.
v.t.
7. to gird or furnish with a belt.
8. to mark as if with a belt or band.
9. to fasten on by means of a belt.
10. to thrash with or as if with a belt.
11. to sing (a song) loudly and energetically.
12. Slang.
a. to swallow (a drink of liquor).
b. to hit; strike.
Idioms:
1. below the belt, unfair or unfairly.
2. under one's belt,
a. in one's stomach, as food or drink.
b. as part of one's background: Get some experience under your belt.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English; compare Old High German balz; both ultimately < Latin balteus]
belt′less, adj.

Belt

 a continuous series of objects, usually encircling something; also a broad strip of any kind usually bordering something.
Examples: belt of lechery, 1483; of mirrors, 1857; of paternosters or “Our Fathers,” 1844; of trees.

belt


Past participle: belted
Gerund: belting

Imperative
belt
belt
Present
I belt
you belt
he/she/it belts
we belt
you belt
they belt
Preterite
I belted
you belted
he/she/it belted
we belted
you belted
they belted
Present Continuous
I am belting
you are belting
he/she/it is belting
we are belting
you are belting
they are belting
Present Perfect
I have belted
you have belted
he/she/it has belted
we have belted
you have belted
they have belted
Past Continuous
I was belting
you were belting
he/she/it was belting
we were belting
you were belting
they were belting
Past Perfect
I had belted
you had belted
he/she/it had belted
we had belted
you had belted
they had belted
Future
I will belt
you will belt
he/she/it will belt
we will belt
you will belt
they will belt
Future Perfect
I will have belted
you will have belted
he/she/it will have belted
we will have belted
you will have belted
they will have belted
Future Continuous
I will be belting
you will be belting
he/she/it will be belting
we will be belting
you will be belting
they will be belting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been belting
you have been belting
he/she/it has been belting
we have been belting
you have been belting
they have been belting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been belting
you will have been belting
he/she/it will have been belting
we will have been belting
you will have been belting
they will have been belting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been belting
you had been belting
he/she/it had been belting
we had been belting
you had been belting
they had been belting
Conditional
I would belt
you would belt
he/she/it would belt
we would belt
you would belt
they would belt
Past Conditional
I would have belted
you would have belted
he/she/it would have belted
we would have belted
you would have belted
they would have belted

belt

Color of belts show proficiency of contestants.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.belt - endless loop of flexible material between two rotating shafts or pulleysbelt - endless loop of flexible material between two rotating shafts or pulleys
band - a driving belt in machinery
belting - the material of which belts are made
conveyer belt, conveyor belt, conveyor, conveyer, transporter - a moving belt that transports objects (as in a factory)
driving belt - a belt that carries motion from a motor to the machinery
fan belt - a belt driven by the crankshaft that drives a fan that pulls air through the radiator
caterpillar track, caterpillar tread, track - an endless metal belt on which tracked vehicles move over the ground
loop - anything with a round or oval shape (formed by a curve that is closed and does not intersect itself)
2.belt - a band to tie or buckle around the body (usually at the waist)belt - a band to tie or buckle around the body (usually at the waist)
accessory, accouterment, accoutrement - clothing that is worn or carried, but not part of your main clothing
baldric, baldrick - a wide (ornamented) belt worn over the right shoulder to support a sword or bugle by the left hip
belt buckle - the buckle used to fasten a belt
belting - the material of which belts are made
cartridge belt - a broad belt with loops or pockets for holding ammunition
holster - a belt with loops or slots for carrying small hand tools
money belt - belt with a concealed section for holding money
life belt, safety belt, safety harness - belt attaching you to some object as a restraint in order to prevent you from getting hurt
Sam Browne belt - leather belt supported by a strap over the right shoulder
3.belt - an elongated region where a specific condition or characteristic is foundbelt - an elongated region where a specific condition or characteristic is found; "a belt of high pressure"
asteroid belt - the region of interplanetary space between Mars and Jupiter where most asteroids are found
greenbelt, greenway - a belt of parks or rural land surrounding a town or city
region, part - the extended spatial location of something; "the farming regions of France"; "religions in all parts of the world"; "regions of outer space"
4.belt - a vigorous blowbelt - a vigorous blow; "the sudden knock floored him"; "he took a bash right in his face"; "he got a bang on the head"
blow, bump - an impact (as from a collision); "the bump threw him off the bicycle"
5.belt - a path or strip (as cut by one course of mowing)belt - a path or strip (as cut by one course of mowing)
track, path, course - a line or route along which something travels or moves; "the hurricane demolished houses in its path"; "the track of an animal"; "the course of the river"
6.belt - ammunition (usually of small caliber) loaded in flexible linked strips for use in a machine gunbelt - ammunition (usually of small caliber) loaded in flexible linked strips for use in a machine gun
ammo, ammunition - projectiles to be fired from a gun
7.belt - the act of hitting vigorouslybelt - the act of hitting vigorously; "he gave the table a whack"
blow - a powerful stroke with the fist or a weapon; "a blow on the head"
Verb1.belt - sing loudly and forcefullybelt - sing loudly and forcefully    
sing - produce tones with the voice; "She was singing while she was cooking"; "My brother sings very well"
2.belt - deliver a blow tobelt - deliver a blow to; "He belted his opponent"
hit - deal a blow to, either with the hand or with an instrument; "He hit her hard in the face"
3.belt - fasten with a beltbelt - fasten with a belt; "belt your trousers"
fasten, fix, secure - cause to be firmly attached; "fasten the lock onto the door"; "she fixed her gaze on the man"
unbelt - undo the belt of; "unbelt your trousers"

belt

noun
1. waistband, band, strap, sash, girdle, girth, cummerbund, ceinture, cincture He wore a belt with a large brass buckle.
2. conveyor belt, band, loop, fan belt, drive belt The turning disc is connected by a drive belt to an electric motor.
3. (Geography) zone, area, region, section, sector, district, stretch, strip, layer, patch, portion, tract a belt of trees
4. (Informal) blow, knock, punch, rap, smack, thump, clout (informal), whack, swipe, wallop (informal) He gave me a belt over the head with a scrubbing brush.
verb
1. (Informal) strike, beat, punch, deck (slang), bang, bash (informal), sock (slang), smack, thump, clout (informal), whack, thud, clobber (slang), wallop (informal), thwack, lay one on (slang) Is it true that she belted old George in the stomach?
2. rush, run, race, fly, speed, spring, tear, bound, dash, hurry, barrel (along) (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), sprint, bolt, dart, hasten We belted down street to where the motor was.
below the belt (Informal) unfair, foul, crooked (informal), cowardly, sly, fraudulent, unjust, dishonest, deceptive, unscrupulous, devious, unethical, sneaky, furtive, deceitful, surreptitious, dishonourable, unsporting, unsportsmanlike, underhanded, not playing the game (informal) Do you think it's a bit below the belt, what they're doing?
belt something out (Informal) blast out, scream, boom out, sing out loud belting out Sinatra and Beatles hits
belt up (Informal) be quiet, shut up (informal), hush, button it (slang), pipe down (slang), hold your tongue, put a sock in it (Brit. slang), keep your trap shut (slang), cut the cackle (informal), button your lip (slang) 'Belt up!' he snapped.

belt

noun
1. A part of the earth's surface:
2. Slang. A sudden sharp, powerful stroke:
Informal: bash, biff, bop, clip, wallop.
Slang: conk, paste.
3. Slang. An act of drinking or the amount swallowed:
Informal: swig.
verb
1. To encircle with or as if with a band:
Archaic: engird.
2. Slang. To deliver a powerful blow to suddenly and sharply:
Informal: biff, bop, clip, wallop.
Slang: conk, paste.
Idioms: let someone have it, sock it to someone.
3. Slang. To take into the mouth and swallow (a liquid):
Informal: swig, toss down (or off).
Translations
حزامحِزامحِزَامسـيْـر ، قِشاطنِطاق، مِنْطَقَه
opasekpáspásekpřipnout opaskemřemen
bæltedrivremlivremspænde
zono
vöö
vyö
pojasremenudaropasačpas
felövezhajtószíjöv
belti-belti, -svæîidrifreimflengjagyrîa, festa meî belti
ベルト
허리띠
balteus
diržasdirželisjuostapriluptisujuostas diržu
apjoztjoslajostalentepērt
uviazať opaskomzbiť remeňom
pas
bältegördelskärp
เข็มขัด
kemerkemerle bağlamakkuşakbölgedöner kayış
thắt lưng

belt

[belt]
A. N
1. (= garment) → cinturón m, fajo m (Mex); (= seat belt) → cinturón m de seguridad
to tighten one's beltapretarse el cinturón
that was below the beltese fue un golpe bajo
he has three novels under his belttiene tres novelas en su haber
it was a belt-and-braces jobse tomaron todas las precauciones posibles
2. (Tech) (= conveyor belt etc) → correa f, cinta f
3. (Geog) (= zone) → zona f
industrial beltcinturón m industrial
B. VT (= thrash) → zurrar (con correa)
he belted me one (= slap) → me dio una torta; (= punch) → me dio un mamporro
C. VI (Brit) (= rush) he belted into the roomentró pitando en la habitación
he belted down the streetsalió pitando por la calle abajo
to belt pastpasar como una bala
D. CPD belt bag Nriñonera f
belt along VI + ADVir como una bala
belt down VT + ADV (US) [+ drink] → cepillarse
belt off VI + ADVsalir pitando
belt out
A. VT + ADV [+ song] → cantar a pleno pulmón
B. VI + ADV (also to come belting out) → salir disparado
belt up VI + ADV
1. (Aut) → abrocharse el cinturón
2. (Brit) (= be quiet) → cerrar el pico, callarse la boca
belt up!¡cállate la boca!

belt

[ˈbɛlt]
n
[trousers, coat] → ceinture f
to tighten one's belt (= make economies) → se serrer la ceinture
to have sth under one's belt (= to one's credit) → avoir qch à son actif
that was below the belt! (= unfair) → quel coup bas!
see also below-the-belt
[machine] → courroie f
(= area) → région f
industrial belt → région f industrielle rust belt
vt
(= thrash) → donner une raclée à
vi (British) (= run) → filer (à toutes jambes)
belt along
vi (= go fast) [car] → aller à toute blinde , foncer; [person] (= run) → courir à toutes jambes
vt fus [+ motorway] → foncer sur
belt down
vt fus [+ road] (= run) → dévaler (= drive) → foncer sur
belt out
vt sep [+ song] → chanter à tue-tête, chanter à pleins poumons
belt up
vi (British) (= be quiet) → la boucler
Why don't you belt up for a change? → Tu ne peux pas la boucler pour une fois?

belt

n
(on clothes) → Gürtel m; (for holding, carrying etc, seat belt) → Gurt m; (Mil etc, on uniform) → Koppel nt; (for cartridges) → Patronengurt m; (= rifle sling)(Gewehr)riemen m; a blow below the belt (lit, fig)ein Schlag munterhalb der Gürtellinie, ein Tiefschlag; to hit somebody below the belt (lit, fig)jdm einen Schlag unter die Gürtellinie versetzen; that was below the beltdas war ein Schlag unter die Gürtellinie; to be a black beltden schwarzen Gürtel haben; to get the belt(mit dem Lederriemen) eine auf die Finger bekommen; to tighten one’s belt (fig)den Gürtel or Riemen enger schnallen; under one’s belt (fig inf)auf dem Rücken (inf)
(Tech) → (Treib)riemen m; (= conveyor belt)Band nt
(= tract of land)Gürtel m; belt of treesWaldstreifen m; (around house etc) → Baumgürtel m; industrial beltIndustriegürtel m ? commuter
(inf: = hit) → Schlag m; to give somebody/the ball a beltjdm eine knallen (inf)/den Ball knallen (inf)
(US: = ring road) → Umgehungsstraße f
(US inf: = drink) → Schluck maus der Pulle (inf)
vt
(= fasten)den Gürtel zumachen (→ sth +gen)
(Sch etc: = thrash) → (mit dem Lederriemen) schlagen
(inf: = hit) → knallen (inf); she belted him one in the eyesie verpasste or haute or knallte ihm eins aufs Auge (inf)
vi (inf: = rush) → rasen (inf); to belt outhinaus-/herausrasen (inf); to belt acrosshinüber-/herüberrasen (inf); we were really belting alongwir sind wirklich gerast (inf); he belted off down the streeter raste davon die Straße hinunter (inf); this novel really belts alongdieser Roman ist wirklich tempogeladen (inf)

belt

[bɛlt]
1. n (gen) → cintura; (of trousers) → cintura, cinghia (Tech) → cinghia (Geog) (zone) → zona, regione f
industrial belt → zona industriale
the cotton belt → la zona di coltivazione del cotone
to tighten one's belt (fig) → tirare la cinghia
that was below the belt (fig) → è stato un colpo basso
2. vt (fam) (thrash) → usare la cinghia con, picchiare
he belted me one → mi ha mollato un pugno
3. vi (fam) (rush) to belt in/outentrare/uscire di gran carriera
he was belting up the motorway at 100 mph → filava sull'autostrada a 100 miglia all'ora
belt out vt + adv (song) → cantare a squarciagola
belt up vi + adv (fam) (be quiet) → chiudere la boccaccia
belt up! → chiudi quella boccaccia!

belt

(belt) noun
1. a long (narrow) piece of leather, cloth etc worn round the waist. a trouser-belt; He tightened his belt.
2. a similar object used to set wheels in motion. the belt of a vacuum-cleaner.
3. a zone of country etc. a belt of trees; an industrial belt.
verb
1. to fasten with a belt. He belted his trousers on.
2. to strike (with or without a belt). He belted the disobedient dog.
ˈbelted adjective

belt

حِزَام opasek bælte Gürtel ζώνη cinturón vyö ceinture pojas cinta ベルト 허리띠 riem belte pasek cinto ремень skärp เข็มขัด kemer thắt lưng 带子

belt

n. cinturón, cinto;
fasten your ___abrocharse el ___.

belt

n cinturón m, cinto; seat o safety — cinturón m de seguridad, cinturón (fam)
References in classic literature ?
Grandmother called my attention to a stout hickory cane, tipped with copper, which hung by a leather thong from her belt.
You needn't dress; you look all right; fasten a belt around your waist.
The tomahawk that he had loosened in his belt for the sake of ease, was even suffered to fall from its usual situation to the ground, and his form seemed to sink, like that of a man whose nerves and sinews were suffered to relax for the purpose of rest.
First comes the ancestor himself, in his black cloak, steeple-hat, and trunk-breeches, girt about the waist with a leathern belt, in which hangs his steel-hilted sword; he has a long staff in his hand, such as gentlemen in advanced life used to carry, as much for the dignity of the thing as for the support to be derived from it.
Next you buckle your greaves on your legs, and your cuisses on your thighs; then come your backplate and your breastplate, and you begin to feel crowded; then you hitch onto the breastplate the half-petticoat of broad overlapping bands of steel which hangs down in front but is scolloped out behind so you can sit down, and isn't any real improvement on an inverted coal scuttle, either for looks or for wear, or to wipe your hands on; next you belt on your sword; then you put your stove-pipe joints onto your arms, your iron gauntlets onto your hands, your iron rat-trap onto your head, with a rag of steel web hitched onto it to hang over the back of your neck -- and there you are, snug as a candle in a candle-mould.
It was 3,122 feet long--over half a mile; every man and me was on foot, and had on his green veil and his blue goggles, and his white rag around his hat, and his coil of rope over one shoulder and under the other, and his ice-ax in his belt, and carried his alpenstock in his left hand, his umbrella
Sometimes a belt of land a quarter of a mile deep will start in and cave along and cave along till it all caves into the river in one summer.
And at the zenith of his fame, how he would suddenly appear at the old village and stalk into church, brown and weather-beaten, in his black velvet doublet and trunks, his great jack-boots, his crimson sash, his belt bristling with horse-pistols, his crime-rusted cut- lass at his side, his slouch hat with waving plumes, his black flag unfurled, with the skull and crossbones on it, and hear with swelling ecstasy the whisperings, "It's Tom Sawyer the Pirate
Her cotton handkerchief was rolled into a hard ball, and in the intervals of reaching the more difficult buttons that lay between her shoulder blades and her belt, she dabbed her wet eyes carefully, so that they should not rain salt water on the finery that had been worn at such a price.
Tha'lt end wi' winnin' th' Belt an' bein' champion prize-fighter of all England.
She had just put the watch back in the belt of her dress, when there came to her -- far off in the stillness of the morning -- a sound of wheels.
The guard soon replaced his blunderbuss in his arm-chest, and, having looked to the rest of its contents, and having looked to the supplementary pistols that he wore in his belt, looked to a smaller chest beneath his seat, in which there were a few smith's tools, a couple of torches, and a tinder-box.