bends


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bend 1

 (bĕnd)
v. bent (bĕnt), bend·ing, bends
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to assume a curved or angular shape: bend a piece of iron into a horseshoe.
b. To bring (a bow, for example) into a state of tension by drawing on a string or line.
c. To force to assume a different direction or shape, according to one's own purpose: "Few will have the greatness to bend history itself, but each of us can work to change a small portion of events" (Robert F. Kennedy).
d. To misrepresent; distort: bend the truth.
e. To relax or make an exception to: bend a rule to allow more members into the club.
2. To cause to swerve from a straight line; deflect: Light is bent as it passes through water.
3. To render submissive; subdue: "[His] words so often bewitched crowds and bent them to his will" (W. Bruce Lincoln).
4. To apply (the mind) closely: "The weary naval officer goes to bed at night having bent his brain all day to a scheme of victory" (Jack Beatty).
5. Nautical To fasten: bend a mainsail onto the boom.
v.intr.
1.
a. To deviate from a straight line or position: The lane bends to the right at the bridge.
b. To assume a curved, crooked, or angular form or direction: The saplings bent in the wind.
2. To incline the body; stoop.
3. To make a concession; yield.
4. To apply oneself closely; concentrate: She bent to her task.
n.
1.
a. The act or fact of bending.
b. The state of being bent.
2. Something bent: a bend in the road.
3. bends Nautical The thick planks in a ship's side; wales.
4. bends(used with a sing. or pl. verb) Decompression sickness. Used with the.
Idioms:
around the bend Slang
Mentally deranged; crazy.
bend (one's) elbow Slang
To drink alcoholic beverages.
bend out of shape Slang
To annoy or anger.
bend/lean over backward
To make an effort greater than is required.
bend (someone's) ear Slang
To talk to at length, usually excessively.

[Middle English benden, from Old English bendan; see bhendh- in Indo-European roots.]

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bend2

bend 2

 (bĕnd)
n.
1. Heraldry A band passing from the upper dexter corner of an escutcheon to the lower sinister corner.
2. Nautical A knot that joins a rope to a rope or another object.

[Middle English, from Old English bend, band, and from Old French bende, bande, band (of Germanic origin; see bhendh- in Indo-European roots).]

Bend

 (bĕnd)
A city of central Oregon on the Deschutes River in the eastern foothills of the Cascade Range.

bends

(bɛndz)
pl n
(Pathology) (functioning as singular or plural) a nontechnical name for decompression sickness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bends - pain resulting from rapid change in pressurebends - pain resulting from rapid change in pressure
illness, sickness, unwellness, malady - impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
Translations

bends

[ˈbɛndz] npl [diver] → maladie f des caissons

bends

n the bendsdie Taucherkrankheit

bends

[bɛndz] npl (Med) the bendsun'embolia

bends, the

npl enfermedad f por descompresión
References in classic literature ?
Who that once bends from the line of his march in a fog can tell when or how to find it again
The sweat starts out on his forehead, and he bends over like a cyclist on the last lap of a race.
Man's boasted power and freedom, all are flown; Lord of the earth and sea, he bends a slave, And woman, lovely woman, reigns alone.
Rochester's foot: he sees it, and bends to examine it.
Now, my father, my story winds back again as the river bends towards its source, and I tell of those events which happened at the king's kraal of Gibamaxegu, which you white people name Gibbeclack, the kraal that is called "Pick-out-the-old-men," for it was there that Chaka murdered all the aged who were unfit for war.
this current divides into two arms, the principal one going towards the coast of Ireland and Norway, whilst the second bends to the south about the height of the Azores; then, touching the African shore, and describing a lengthened oval, returns to the Antilles.
Albert passed his hand over his forehead, as if to try his strength, as a man who is preparing to defend his life proves his shield and bends his sword.
Formerly he would have approached the queen as a young man who bends before a woman; but now it was a different thing; he answered her summons as an humble soldier obeys an illustrious general.
He bends his head, and moves with an indescribable obliquity of gait, as if unwilling to display his full front to the world.
It is three times as old as your Grandfather; but a year makes no impression on its oaken frame, while it bends the old man nearer and nearer to the earth; so let me go on with my stories while I may.
The high walls and rocks, within which the travellers had been so long inclosed, now occasionally presented openings, through which they were enabled to ascend to the plain, and to cut off considerable bends of the river.
As when Jove bends his bright bow in heaven in token to mankind either of war or of the chill storms that stay men from their labour and plague the flocks--even so, wrapped in such radiant raiment, did Minerva go in among the host and speak man by man to each.