benefactor


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ben·e·fac·tor

 (bĕn′ə-făk′tər)
n.
One that gives aid, especially financial aid.

[Middle English, from Late Latin, from Latin benefacere, to do a service; see benefaction.]

benefactor

(ˈbɛnɪˌfæktə; ˌbɛnɪˈfæk-)
n
a person who supports or helps a person, institution, etc, esp by giving money; patron
ˈbeneˌfactress fem n

ben•e•fac•tor

(ˈbɛn əˌfæk tər, ˌbɛn əˈfæk-)

n.
1. a person who confers a benefit.
2. a person who makes a bequest or endowment, as to an institution.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.benefactor - a person who helps people or institutions (especially with financial help)benefactor - a person who helps people or institutions (especially with financial help)
benefactress - a woman benefactor
bondswoman, bondsman - someone who signs a bond as surety for someone else
bestower, conferrer, donor, giver, presenter - person who makes a gift of property
donor - (medicine) someone who gives blood or tissue or an organ to be used in another person (the host)
fairy godmother - a generous benefactor
good person - a person who is good to other people
good Samaritan - a person who voluntarily offers help or sympathy in times of trouble
do-gooder, humanitarian, improver - someone devoted to the promotion of human welfare and to social reforms
liberator - someone who releases people from captivity or bondage
accommodator, obliger - someone who performs a service or does a favor
offerer, offeror - someone who presents something to another for acceptance or rejection
sponsor, supporter, patron - someone who supports or champions something
provider - someone who provides the means for subsistence
rescuer, savior, saviour, deliverer - a person who rescues you from harm or danger
sparer - someone who refrains from injuring or destroying
uncle - a source of help and advice and encouragement; "he played uncle to lonely students"

benefactor

noun supporter, friend, champion, defender, sponsor, angel (informal), patron, promoter, contributor, backer, helper, subsidizer, philanthropist, upholder, well-wisher In his old age he became a benefactor of the arts.

benefactor

noun
1. A person who supports or champions an activity, cause, or institution, for example:
Informal: angel.
2. A person who gives to a charity or cause:
Translations
مُحْسِن، مُتَبَرِّع
dobrodinecmecenáš
velgører
jótevõ
velgjörîarmaîur
geradarys
labdarisziedotājs
dobrodinec
bağış yapan kimsehayırsever/yardımsever kimse

benefactor

[ˈbenɪfæktəʳ] Nbienhechor(a) m/f, benefactor(a) m/f

benefactor

[ˌbɛnɪˈfæktər ˈbɛnɪfæktər] nbienfaiteur m

benefactor

nWohltäter m; (= giver of money also)Gönner m

benefactor

[ˈbɛnɪfæktəʳ] nbenefattore m

benefactor

(ˈbenəfӕktə) noun
a person who gives friendly help, often in the form of money. the benefactor of the school.
References in classic literature ?
Thoroughgood, for that was the name of my benefactor, gave orders that I should have hay and oats every night and morning, and the run of the meadow during the day, and, "you, Willie," said he, "must take the oversight of him; I give him in charge to you.
An atmosphere of sympathetic influence encircles every human being; and the man or woman who feels strongly, healthily and justly, on the great interests of humanity, is a constant benefactor to the human race.
He who gives himself entirely to his fellow men appears to them useless and selfish; but he who gives himself partially to them in pronounced a benefactor and philanthropist.
Whoever has lived long enough to find out what life is, knows how deep a debt of gratitude we owe to Adam, the first great benefactor of our race.
I have heard him do so laughingly, saying, among other things, that he was the only benefactor of his country in the company, and that when others would do as much as he had done, we should be relieved of "the d d niggers.
He was not insolent to his benefactor, he was simply insensible; though knowing perfectly the hold he had on his heart, and conscious he had only to speak and all the house would be obliged to bend to his wishes.
Zurich was congratulated on the possession of a Paragon of public virtue; and William Tell, in the character of benefactor to Switzerland, was compared disadvantageously with Mrs.
The great door clanged behind him, and Monsieur the Marquis crossed a hall grim with certain old boar-spears, swords, and knives of the chase; grimmer with certain heavy riding-rods and riding-whips, of which many a peasant, gone to his benefactor Death, had felt the weight when his lord was angry.
I am persuaded she knew no difference between his having been a personal benefactor of hers, and a kind friend to me, and that she would have received him with the utmost gratitude and devotion in any case.
as if it were a well-known fact that I contemplated murdering a near relation, provided I could only induce one to have the weakness to become my benefactor.
Let him live outside his income, or shirk the resolute honest work that brings wages, and he will presently find himself dreaming of a possible benefactor, a possible simpleton who may be cajoled into using his interest, a possible state of mind in some possible person not yet forthcoming.
It seemed as if his avarice were struggling with his better nature, and compelling him to pouch zecchin after zecchin while his generosity urged him to restore some part at least to his benefactor, or as a donation to his agent.