benevolence


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be·nev·o·lence

 (bə-nĕv′ə-ləns)
n.
1. An inclination to perform kind, charitable acts.
2.
a. A kindly act.
b. A gift given out of generosity.
3. A compulsory tax or payment exacted by some English sovereigns without the consent of Parliament.

benevolence

(bɪˈnɛvələns)
n
1. Also: benevolentness inclination or tendency to help or do good to others; charity
2. an act of kindness
3. (Historical Terms) (in the Middle Ages) a forced loan or contribution exacted by English kings from their nobility and subjects

be•nev•o•lence

(bəˈnɛv ə ləns)

n.
1. desire to do good to others; goodwill; charity.
2. an act of kindness; charitable gift.
3. (formerly) a forced contribution to an English sovereign.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.benevolence - disposition to do goodbenevolence - disposition to do good    
love - a strong positive emotion of regard and affection; "his love for his work"; "children need a lot of love"
beneficence - doing good; feeling beneficent
malevolence, malignity - wishing evil to others
2.benevolence - an inclination to do kind or charitable acts
kindness - the quality of being warmhearted and considerate and humane and sympathetic
brotherly love, charity - a kindly and lenient attitude toward people
3.benevolence - an act intending or showing kindness and good willbenevolence - an act intending or showing kindness and good will
benignity, kindness - a kind act

benevolence

benevolence

noun
Translations
blahovůleshovívavost
generøsitetgodhjertethed
góîvild
dosnumasgeradarystėgeranoriškaigero linkintislinkėjimas gero
augstsirdībalabsirdībalabvēlība
benevolencia
cömertlikyardımseverlik

benevolence

[bɪˈnevələns] Nbenevolencia f

benevolence

[bɪˈnɛvələns] n
[ruler, system] → bienveillance f
(= kindness) → générosité f
(= good will) → bienveillance f

benevolence

nWohlwollen nt; (of smile, gesture)Gutmütigkeit f; (as character trait) → Güte f; (of emperor, judge)Milde f

benevolence

[bɪˈnɛvələns] nbenevolenza

benevolence

(biˈnevələns) noun
generosity and desire to do good.
beˈnevolent adjective
a benevolent father.
beˈnevolently adverb
References in classic literature ?
Jo often watched him, trying to discover the charm, and at last decided that it was benevolence which worked the miracle.
While the latter expression was yet on his lips, he caught a glimpse of Hepzibah, who had involuntarily bent forward to the window; and then the smile changed from acrid and disagreeable to the sunniest complacency and benevolence.
What I saw in him -- as evidently as the indestructible ramparts of Old Ticonderoga, already cited as the most appropriate simile -- was the features of stubborn and ponderous endurance, which might well have amounted to obstinacy in his earlier days; of integrity, that, like most of his other endowments, lay in a somewhat heavy mass, and was just as unmalleable or unmanageable as a ton of iron ore; and of benevolence which, fiercely as he led the bayonets on at Chippewa or Fort Erie, I take to be of quite as genuine a stamp as what actuates any or all the polemical philanthropists of the age.
Hereby perhaps Stubb indirectly hinted, that though man loved his fellow, yet man is a money-making animal, which propensity too often interferes with his benevolence.
In fact, if not exactly a believer in the doctrine of the efficiency of the extra good works of saints, he really seemed somehow or other to fancy that his wife had piety and benevolence enough for two--to indulge a shadowy expectation of getting into heaven through her superabundance of qualities to which he made no particular pretension.
They are professedly a custom established by the benevolence of the slaveholders; but I undertake to say, it is the result of selfishness, and one of the grossest frauds committed upon the down-trodden slave.
They were alike too, in a general benevolence of temper, and a strong habit of regard for every old acquaintance.
It was quite out of the benevolence of her heart, that she had asked these young women to her house; merely because she thought they deserved some attention, were harmless, well-behaved girls, and would be pleasant companions; for otherwise we both wished very much to have invited you and Marianne to be with us, while your kind friend there, was attending her daughter.
He lifted up the sable waves of hair which lay horizontally over his brow, and showed a solid enough mass of intellectual organs, but an abrupt deficiency where the suave sign of benevolence should have risen.
Pray, don't imagine that he conceals depths of benevolence and affection beneath a stern exterior
Lorry, "I may appeal to a gentleman of your years and benevolence, to put it to this other gentleman, so much your junior, whether he can under any circumstances reconcile it to his station to play that Ace of which he has spoken.
The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence, were, all, my business.