benignant


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Related to benignant: vociferation

be·nig·nant

 (bĭ-nĭg′nənt)
adj.
1. Favorable; beneficial.
2. Kind and gracious.

be·nig′nant·ly adv.

benignant

(bɪˈnɪɡnənt)
adj
1. kind; gracious, as a king to his subjects
2. a less common word for benign3, benign4
beˈnignancy n
beˈnignantly adv

be•nig•nant

(bɪˈnɪg nənt)

adj.
1. benign; gracious: a benignant sovereign.
2. exerting a good influence; beneficial.
[1775–85; on the model of malignant]
be•nig′nan•cy, n.
be•nig′nant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.benignant - pleasant and beneficial in nature or influencebenignant - pleasant and beneficial in nature or influence; "a benign smile"; "the benign sky"; "the benign influence of pure air"
harmless - not causing or capable of causing harm; "harmless bacteria"; "rendered the bomb harmless"
kind - having or showing a tender and considerate and helpful nature; used especially of persons and their behavior; "kind to sick patients"; "a kind master"; "kind words showing understanding and sympathy"; "thanked her for her kind letter"
2.benignant - characterized by kindness and warm courtesy especially of a king to his subjectsbenignant - characterized by kindness and warm courtesy especially of a king to his subjects; "our benignant king"
kind - having or showing a tender and considerate and helpful nature; used especially of persons and their behavior; "kind to sick patients"; "a kind master"; "kind words showing understanding and sympathy"; "thanked her for her kind letter"

benignant

adjective
Translations

benignant

[bɪˈnɪgnənt] ADJbenigno (also Med); (= healthy) → saludable
References in classic literature ?
Benignant and splendid, or splendid and sinister, the western sky reflects the hidden purposes of the royal mind.
Here Nature appears in her richest attire, and Art, dressed with the modestest simplicity, attends her benignant mistress.
Gathergold, with his vast wealth, might transform himself into an angel of beneficence, and assume a control over human affairs as wide and benignant as the smile of the Great Stone Face.
Davis was quite benignant in the afternoon, also unusually nervous.
About ten o'clock some twenty ladies were sitting around about the ladies' saloon, quietly reading, sewing, embroidering, and so on, and among them sat a sweet, benignant old dame with round spectacles on her nose and her busy knitting-needles in her hands.
This remark was not calculated to make Edward or Elinor more easy, nor to conciliate the good will of Lucy, who looked up at Marianne with no very benignant expression.
From these causes it arose that Marcus, Pertinax, and Alexander, being all men of modest life, lovers of justice, enemies to cruelty, humane, and benignant, came to a sad end except Marcus; he alone lived and died honoured, because he had succeeded to the throne by hereditary title, and owed nothing either to the soldiers or the people; and afterwards, being possessed of many virtues which made him respected, he always kept both orders in their places whilst he lived, and was neither hated nor despised.
Irwine bowed to her with a benignant deference, which would have been equally in place if she had been the most dignified lady of his acquaintance.
You have a right to feel your susceptibility excited, however benignant it may be.
It came upon me as the close of the benignant history I had been pursuing, and I felt that I had but one thing to do.
With his story in one's mind he can almost see his benignant countenance moving calmly among the haggard faces of Milan in the days when the plague swept the city, brave where all others were cowards, full of compassion where pity had been crushed out of all other breasts by the instinct of self-preservation gone mad with terror, cheering all, praying with all, helping all, with hand and brain and purse, at a time when parents forsook their children, the friend deserted the friend, and the brother turned away from the sister while her pleadings were still wailing in his ears.
she would ask, and the absence of any poet or painter or novelist of the true caliber at the present day was a text upon which she liked to ruminate, in a sunset mood of benignant reminiscence, which it would have been hard to disturb had there been need.