bequest


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be·quest

 (bĭ-kwĕst′)
n.
1. Law The act of giving or leaving personal property by a will.
2. Something that is bequeathed; a legacy.

[Middle English biquest (influenced by biquethen, to bequeath) : bi-, be- + quist, will (from Old English -cwis, as in andcwis, answer; see gwet- in Indo-European roots).]

bequest

(bɪˈkwɛst)
n
1.
a. the act of bequeathing
b. something that is bequeathed
2. (Law) law a gift of property by will, esp personal property. Compare devise4, devise5
[C14: be- + Old English -cwiss degree; see bequeath]

be•quest

(bɪˈkwɛst)

n.
1. the act of bequeathing.
2. legacy.
[1250–1300; Middle English biqueste, biquyste]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bequest - (law) a gift of personal property by will
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
inheritance, heritage - that which is inherited; a title or property or estate that passes by law to the heir on the death of the owner
gift - something acquired without compensation

bequest

noun legacy, gift, settlement, heritage, trust, endowment, estate, inheritance, dower, bestowal Only one in eight leaves a bequest to charity.
Translations
وَصِيَّةُ إرث
dědictvíodkaz
arv
hagyaték
arfleiîslugjöf

bequest

[bɪˈkwest] Nlegado m

bequest

[bɪˈkwɛst] n (= legacy) → legs m

bequest

n (= act of bequeathing)Vermachen nt (→ to an +acc); (= legacy)Nachlass m

bequest

[bɪˈkwɛst] nlascito

bequeath

(biˈkwiːð) verb
to leave (personal belongings) by will. She bequeathed her art collection to the town.
bequest (biˈkwest) noun
something bequeathed in a will. I received a bequest in my uncle's will.
References in classic literature ?
Besides, the words Legacy, Bequest, go side by side with the words, Death, Funeral.
He was neither so unjust, nor so ungrateful, as to leave his estate from his nephew;--but he left it to him on such terms as destroyed half the value of the bequest.
The term he used was odd, for it was 'bequeathed,' but no such bequest of Mesmer was ever made known.
The amiable old gentleman, it seemed, had intended to leave the whole to the Royal Humane Society, and had indeed executed a will to that effect; but the Institution, having been unfortunate enough, a few months before, to save the life of a poor relation to whom he paid a weekly allowance of three shillings and sixpence, he had, in a fit of very natural exasperation, revoked the bequest in a codicil, and left it all to Mr Godfrey Nickleby; with a special mention of his indignation, not only against the society for saving the poor relation's life, but against the poor relation also, for allowing himself to be saved.
It was well worth adding to the poet's great bequest to English literature.
I could ascertain nothing in relation to it, except that the bequest was accompanied by some cynical remarks, to the effect that the testator would feel happy if his legacy were instrumental in reviving the dormant interest of only one member of Doctor Softly's family in the fortunes of the hopeful young gentleman who had run away from home.
There was just such an informality in the terms of the bequest as to give me no hope from law.
At the end of a year he would be free to return to the cloisters, for such had been his father's bequest.
An awkward interest (awkward because romantic) attaches to Miss Bud in the minds of the young ladies, on account of its being known to them that a husband has been chosen for her by will and bequest, and that her guardian is bound down to bestow her on that husband when he comes of age.
If Gilbert Clennam, reduced to imbecility, at the point of death, and labouring under the delusion of some imaginary relenting towards a girl of whom he had heard that his nephew had once had a fancy for her which he had crushed out of him, and that she afterwards drooped away into melancholy and withdrawal from all who knew her--if, in that state of weakness, he dictated to me, whose life she had darkened with her sin, and who had been appointed to know her wickedness from her own hand and her own lips, a bequest meant as a recompense to her for supposed unmerited suffering; was there no difference between my spurning that injustice, and coveting mere money--a thing which you, and your comrades in the prisons, may steal from anyone?
And, in making this bequest, I wi sh to place it on record that I am not only expressing my own sense of Madame Lecompte's attachment and fidelity in the capacity of my housekeeper, but that I also believe myself to be executing the intentions of my deceased father, who, but for the circumstance of his dying intestate, would have left Madame Lecompte, in his will, the same token of grateful regard for her services which I now leave her in mine.
Peggotty derived a steady, though certainly a very moderate income from the bequest of his late brother-in-law, I promised to do so.