bereave


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be·reave

 (bĭ-rēv′)
tr.v. be·reaved or be·reft (-rĕft′), be·reav·ing, be·reaves
1. To take a loved one from (a person), especially by death: "Cry aloud for the man who is dead, for the woman and children bereaved" (Alan Paton).
2. To take something valuable or necessary from (a person or thing): "He was subject to fits, which bereaved him ... of his senses" (David Hume).

[Middle English bireven, to deprive, from Old English berēafian; see reup- in Indo-European roots.]

be·reave′ment n.
be·reav′er n.

bereave

(bɪˈriːv)
vb (tr)
1. (usually foll by of) to deprive (of) something or someone valued, esp through death
2. obsolete to remove by force
[Old English bereafian; see reave1]

be•reave

(bɪˈriv)

v.t. -reaved -reft, -reav•ing.
1. to deprive and make desolate, esp. by death: Illness bereaved them of their mother.
2. to deprive ruthlessly or by force: War bereft us of our home.
[before 900; Middle English bereven, Old English berēafian, c. Old Saxon birōbōn, Old High German biroubōn, Gothic biraubon to rob]
be•reave′ment, n.
be•reav′er, n.

bereave


Past participle: bereaved
Gerund: bereaving

Imperative
bereave
bereave
Present
I bereave
you bereave
he/she/it bereaves
we bereave
you bereave
they bereave
Preterite
I bereaved
you bereaved
he/she/it bereaved
we bereaved
you bereaved
they bereaved
Present Continuous
I am bereaving
you are bereaving
he/she/it is bereaving
we are bereaving
you are bereaving
they are bereaving
Present Perfect
I have bereaved
you have bereaved
he/she/it has bereaved
we have bereaved
you have bereaved
they have bereaved
Past Continuous
I was bereaving
you were bereaving
he/she/it was bereaving
we were bereaving
you were bereaving
they were bereaving
Past Perfect
I had bereaved
you had bereaved
he/she/it had bereaved
we had bereaved
you had bereaved
they had bereaved
Future
I will bereave
you will bereave
he/she/it will bereave
we will bereave
you will bereave
they will bereave
Future Perfect
I will have bereaved
you will have bereaved
he/she/it will have bereaved
we will have bereaved
you will have bereaved
they will have bereaved
Future Continuous
I will be bereaving
you will be bereaving
he/she/it will be bereaving
we will be bereaving
you will be bereaving
they will be bereaving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been bereaving
you have been bereaving
he/she/it has been bereaving
we have been bereaving
you have been bereaving
they have been bereaving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been bereaving
you will have been bereaving
he/she/it will have been bereaving
we will have been bereaving
you will have been bereaving
they will have been bereaving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been bereaving
you had been bereaving
he/she/it had been bereaving
we had been bereaving
you had been bereaving
they had been bereaving
Conditional
I would bereave
you would bereave
he/she/it would bereave
we would bereave
you would bereave
they would bereave
Past Conditional
I would have bereaved
you would have bereaved
he/she/it would have bereaved
we would have bereaved
you would have bereaved
they would have bereaved
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.bereave - deprive through deathbereave - deprive through death    
deprive, divest, strip - take away possessions from someone; "The Nazis stripped the Jews of all their assets"
Translations

bereave

[bɪˈriːv] (bereft (pt, pp)) VTprivar (of de)

bereave

vt
pret, ptp <bereft> (liter, = deprive) → berauben (geh) (→ of +gen)
pret, ptp <bereaved> (= cause loss by death: illness) (→ jdm jdn) → rauben (geh), → nehmen; he was bereaved of his sonsein Sohn ist ihm genommen worden (geh)
References in classic literature ?
Forsake me not thus, ADAM, witness Heav'n What love sincere, and reverence in my heart I beare thee, and unweeting have offended, Unhappilie deceav'd; thy suppliant I beg, and clasp thy knees; bereave me not, Whereon I live, thy gentle looks, thy aid, Thy counsel in this uttermost distress, My onely strength and stay: forlorn of thee, Whither shall I betake me, where subsist?
The observations of the judicious Blackstone,[1] in reference to the latter, are well worthy of recital: "To bereave a man of life, [says he] or by violence to confiscate his estate, without accusation or trial, would be so gross and notorious an act of despotism, as must at once convey the alarm of tyranny throughout the whole nation; but confinement of the person, by secretly hurrying him to jail, where his sufferings are unknown or forgotten, is a less public, a less striking, and therefore a more dangerous engine of arbitrary government.
What we love that we have, but by desire we bereave ourselves of the love.