berrylike


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berrylike

(ˈbɛrɪˌlaɪk)
adj
resembling a berry or berries
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.berrylike - resembling a berryberrylike - resembling a berry      
References in periodicals archive ?
Like many other junipers, it has blue, berrylike fruit that is attractive to cedar waxwings and other birds.
It displays low numbers of large ([equivalent] 2-[micro]m) pale-yellow and round vacuoles, thus resulting in its characteristic berrylike shape.
Oozing, melted surfaces shared space with an upper border composed of alternating patches of green crackle, topped by two mismatched berrylike forms, which although they could not be confused with maraschino cherries, their presence suggested a similar dramatic flourish.
The presence of numerous relatively large (> 50 cells) balls of cells with berrylike external contours is characteristic of MM.
Bakain, Dhrek Tree bearing (Meliacaee) Persian Lilac hanging berrylike fruits.
But because local growers don't have to worry about whether their goods will survive days crammed into a box on a jet, they can cultivate a dizzying array of seasonal beauties--like delicate hellebores, Queen Anne's lace, berrylike rose hips, fluffy snowball viburnum, and fragrant sweet peas.
Like Pommard, Volnay is well balanced and approachable when young, full of vibrant, berrylike fruit.
As just on example of the level of complexity that may occur between orchids and other members of its environment, the underground orchid Rhizanthella gardneri of Western Australia has an obligate mycorrhizal relationship with Melaleuca uncinata, a fungus gnat and a termite as specialist pollinators and a specialist marsupial dispersal agent of their berrylike indehiscent seeds.
05 percent or less, it confers a fruity, berrylike character with seedy undertones, which is excellent for fruit drinks.
Echinococcus is derived from the Greek echinos meaning hedgehog or sea urchin and kokkus meaning berry, which describes the numerous, spiny hooklets seen in the berrylike scolex of the larva form of the parasite.
Some wild berries or berrylike fruits are not edible, even though, like poison ivy and Virginia creeper berries, they may be avidly consumed by wildlife.