besetting


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be·set·ting

 (bĭ-sĕt′ĭng)
adj.
Constantly troubling or attacking.

besetting

(bɪˈsɛtɪŋ)
adj
tempting, harassing, or assailing (esp in the phrase besetting sin)

be•set•ting

(bɪˈsɛt ɪŋ)

adj.
constantly assailing or obsessing: a besetting temptation.
[1540–50]
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Translations

besetting

[bɪˈsetɪŋ] ADJ [vice, failing] → grande
his besetting sinsu gran pecado

besetting

[bɪˈsɛtɪŋ] adj
his besetting sin → son vice, son grand défaut

besetting

adj his besetting sineine ständige Untugend von ihm; his one besetting worrydie Sorge, die ihn nicht loslässt

besetting

[bɪˈsɛtɪŋ] adj his besetting sinil suo più grande difetto
References in classic literature ?
This sort of contempt for eminences, or rather dread of the labor of ascending them, might have been termed the besetting weakness of the warfare of the period.
I know he couldn't love a Linton; and yet he'd be quite capable of marrying your fortune and expectations: avarice is growing with him a besetting sin.
Lecount -- returning insidiously, in company with that besetting anxiety to talk about his grievances, which had got the better of him at the breakfast-table, and which had shown the wound inflicted on his vanity to his wife's maid.
Rather, they originated in a strange besetting desire to know what to do when the time came; a desire gigantically disproportionate to the few swift moments to which it referred; a wondering that was more like the wondering of some other spirit within his, than his own.
But I thought - I implore you to remember the narrow construction which has been my besetting sin - that, in a case where there was so much disparity in point of years -'
My terror, as I lay there, of falling ill and being unfitted for tomorrow, was so besetting, that I wonder it did not disable me of itself.
His besetting sin at archery had ever been an undue haste and carelessness.
replied Planchet, recurring to his besetting idea, "that Monsieur Bonacieux has something vicious in his eyebrows, and something very unpleasant in the play of his lips.
These are the five besetting sins of a general, ruinous to the conduct of war.