besotted


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be·sot

 (bĭ-sŏt′)
tr.v. be·sot·ted, be·sot·ting, be·sots
To muddle or stupefy, as with alcoholic liquor or infatuation.

[be- + sot, to stupefy (from sot, fool; see sot) or from assot, to befool (from Old French assoter, from sot, foolish).]

besotted

(bɪˈsɒtɪd)
adj
1. stupefied with drink; intoxicated
2. infatuated; doting
3. foolish; muddled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.besotted - very drunkbesotted - very drunk        
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
drunk, inebriated, intoxicated - stupefied or excited by a chemical substance (especially alcohol); "a noisy crowd of intoxicated sailors"; "helplessly inebriated"

besotted

besotted

adjective
Stupefied, excited, or muddled with alcoholic liquor:
Informal: cockeyed, stewed.
Idioms: drunk as a skunk, half-seas over, high as a kite, in one's cups, three sheets in the wind.
Translations

besotted

[bɪˈsɒtɪd] ADJ
1. (= infatuated) he is besotted with heranda loco por ella
they are besotted with loveestán enamoradísimos
2. (= foolish) → atontado, entontecido
3. besotted with drinkembrutecido por la bebida

besotted

[bɪˈsɒtɪd] adj (British) (= fervent) [fan, admirer, lover] → fervent(e)
besotted with [+ person] → entiché(e) de

besotted

adj
(= drunk)berauscht (with von)
(= infatuated)völlig vernarrt (→ with in +acc); (with idea) → berauscht (with von)

besotted

[bɪˈsɒtɪd] adj besotted with sbinfatuato/a di qn
References in classic literature ?
There is no folly so besotted that the idiotic rivalries of society, the prurience, the rashness, the blindness of youth, will not hurry a man to its commission.
Much did I wonder that so good a knight as Brian de Bois-Guilbert seemed so fondly besotted on the charms of this female, whom I received into this house merely to place a bar betwixt their growing intimacy, which else might have been cemented at the expense of the fall of our valiant and religious brother.
He seems besotted," said Danglars, pushing Caderousse with his knee.
But in the engraving there was no desolation; no dirt; no rags; no fleas; no ugly features; no sore eyes; no feasting flies; no besotted ignorance in the countenances; no raw places on the donkeys' backs; no disagreeable jabbering in unknown tongues; no stench of camels; no suggestion that a couple of tons of powder placed under the party and touched off would heighten the effect and give to the scene a genuine interest and a charm which it would always be pleasant to recall, even though a man lived a thousand years.
rich enough to make the Canadian in his wagon, the itinerant with his consul's paper which commends him "To the charitable," the swarthy Italian with his few broken words of English, the lame pauper hunted by overseers from town to town, even the poor insane or besotted wreck of man or woman, feel the noble exception of your presence and your house from the general bleakness and stoniness; to make such feel that they were greeted with a voice which made them both remember and hope?
Watching her gravely, he asked himself why he had been so besotted with passion for her.
It was not in Dorothea's nature, for longer than the duration of a paroxysm, to sit in the narrow cell of her calamity, in the besotted misery of a consciousness that only sees another's lot as an accident of its own.
Young man, a whisper even sprang up in obscure malignity, that one ignorant and besotted Churl (a parent) so committed himself as to object to it by name.
They were mostly old men, feeble or besotted, and all they knew was work--where jobs might be good, where jobs had been good; but the places they mentioned were always a long way off.
The few are philosophers besotted with admiration for the sound of their own lecturing voices, visionaries who waste their lives on fantastic impossibilities, or quacks whose ambition soars no higher than our corns.
That what we falsely call a religious cry is easily raised by men who have no religion, and who in their daily practice set at nought the commonest principles of right and wrong; that it is begotten of intolerance and persecution; that it is senseless, besotted, inveterate and unmerciful; all History teaches us.
Both expressed their opinion that a more independent, a more enlightened, a more public- spirited, a more noble-minded, a more disinterested set of men than those who had promised to vote for him, never existed on earth; each darkly hinted his suspicions that the electors in the opposite interest had certain swinish and besotted infirmities which rendered them unfit for the exercise of the important duties they were called upon to discharge.