betacarotene


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Related to betacarotene: cholecalciferol, nicotinamide

betacarotene

(ˌbiːtəˈkærəˌtiːn)
n
(Biochemistry) the most important form of the plant pigment carotene, which occurs in milk, vegetables, and other foods and, when eaten by man and animals, is converted in the body to vitamin A
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Carrots are a good source of betacarotene, which our bodies make into vitamin A, important for normal vision, healthy skin and a healthy immune system.
They contain betacarotene, a provitamin that is converted into vitamin A in the body.
Betacarotene is converted by the body into the form of Vitamin A called retinol that's used by cells in the eyes that detect light and convert it into nerve impulses.
Serving vegetables with a small amount of fat makes it easier for the body to absorb vitamins A, D, E and K, plus some phytochemicals like betacarotene," says Fiona.
Tenders are invited for Antioxidant Cat/Tab Containg Atleast Betacarotene Selenium Vitamin E Without Food/Dietary Supplement Mark On Strip /Packing
Mangoes are rich in minerals like potassium, magnesium and copper, and they are one of the best sources of quercetin, betacarotene, and astragalin.
Using selective breeding and molecular techniques, Dr Sunette Laurie and colleagues at the Agricultural Research Council in Pretoria boosted levels of betacarotene, the compound which gives the vegetable its characteristic orange colour and which is converted by the body to vitamin A.
This one has a combination of alphacarotene and betacarotene pigments; both of them are associated with the development of orange colour.
Golden Rice" contains betacarotene, a source of Vitamin A.
Great ways to serve fruit & veg at its seasonal best: Carrots High in fibre, brimming with healthy betacarotene and with a unique flavour, carrots are the nation's favourite veg.
offer betacarotene or provitamin A, which, according to research offers protective benefits against cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer.
Apricots, peaches and nectarines are rich in vitamin C and betacarotene, whilst pears provide fibre, pectin and vitamin B.