betake

(redirected from betakes)

be·take

 (bĭ-tāk′)
tr.v. be·took (-to͝ok′), be·tak·en (-tā′kən), be·tak·ing, be·takes
1. To cause (oneself) to go or move.
2. Archaic To commit.

[Middle English bitaken : bi-, be- + taken, to take; see take.]

betake

(bɪˈteɪk)
vb (tr) , -takes, -taking, -took or -taken
1. betake oneself to go; move
2. archaic to apply (oneself) to

be•take

(bɪˈteɪk)

v.t. -took, -tak•en, -tak•ing.
1. to cause (oneself) to go.
2. Archaic. to devote (oneself) to.
[1175–1225]

betake


Past participle: betaken
Gerund: betaking

Imperative
betake
betake
Present
I betake
you betake
he/she/it betakes
we betake
you betake
they betake
Preterite
I betook
you betook
he/she/it betook
we betook
you betook
they betook
Present Continuous
I am betaking
you are betaking
he/she/it is betaking
we are betaking
you are betaking
they are betaking
Present Perfect
I have betaken
you have betaken
he/she/it has betaken
we have betaken
you have betaken
they have betaken
Past Continuous
I was betaking
you were betaking
he/she/it was betaking
we were betaking
you were betaking
they were betaking
Past Perfect
I had betaken
you had betaken
he/she/it had betaken
we had betaken
you had betaken
they had betaken
Future
I will betake
you will betake
he/she/it will betake
we will betake
you will betake
they will betake
Future Perfect
I will have betaken
you will have betaken
he/she/it will have betaken
we will have betaken
you will have betaken
they will have betaken
Future Continuous
I will be betaking
you will be betaking
he/she/it will be betaking
we will be betaking
you will be betaking
they will be betaking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been betaking
you have been betaking
he/she/it has been betaking
we have been betaking
you have been betaking
they have been betaking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been betaking
you will have been betaking
he/she/it will have been betaking
we will have been betaking
you will have been betaking
they will have been betaking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been betaking
you had been betaking
he/she/it had been betaking
we had been betaking
you had been betaking
they had been betaking
Conditional
I would betake
you would betake
he/she/it would betake
we would betake
you would betake
they would betake
Past Conditional
I would have betaken
you would have betaken
he/she/it would have betaken
we would have betaken
you would have betaken
they would have betaken
Translations

betake

[bɪˈteɪk] (betook (pt) (betaken (pp))) VT (liter) to betake o.s. todirigirse a, trasladarse a

betake

pret <betook>, ptp <betaken>
vr (old, hum)sich begeben
References in classic literature ?
The same secludedness and isolation to which the schoolmaster whale betakes himself in his advancing years, is true of all aged Sperm Whales.
but supposing the invader of domestic bliss to betake himself away at the first rush of the harem's lord, then is it very diverting to watch that lord.
Often of a long winter's evening we would first have tea at the big round table, and then betake ourselves to our work; the while that, to amuse the child and to keep her out of mischief, the old lady would set herself to tell stories.
This unhappy man had made the very principle of his life to consist in the pursuit and systematic exercise revenge; and when, by its completest triumph consummation that evil principle was left with no further material to support it -- when, in short, there was no more Devil's work on earth for him to do, it only remained for the unhumanised mortal to betake himself whither his master would find him tasks enough, and pay him his wages duly.
His second object was to provide beforehand for destroying all traces of the destination to which he might betake himself when he left Aldborough on the wedding-day.
Outside of the city, specifically across the Thames, which Goodman describes as a territory across the ocean, "she betakes herself to the Sea, and makes a discovery vpon the water," a wilderness outside the borders of the state and a coherent community.
When she wants to be honored, she betakes herself to the golden part of her house and remains there, adorning and beautifying her body, dressing herself like a queen, in a long robe that trails behind her and is variously scented and brightly colored, as silks and woolens can be, depending on the plants and seeds and many other things used to dye the clothes worn by all rich people who are preparing to receive honors.
27-30) [The shepherd flees our turf / And betakes himself and his flock far away; before the house / He keeps a formidable watch: the importunate and impudent plebeians / that formerly would beset themselves upon us / now fear to come near our threshold.