bewitched


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be·witch

 (bĭ-wĭch′)
tr.v. be·witched, be·witch·ing, be·witch·es
1. To place under one's power by magic; cast a spell over.
2. To captivate completely; fascinate. See Synonyms at charm.

[Middle English biwicchen : probably bi-, be- + wicchen (from Old English wiccian, from wicce, witch, or wicca, sorcerer); see weg- in Indo-European roots.]

be·witch′er n.
be·witch′er·y n.
be·witch′ing·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bewitched - under a spellbewitched - under a spell        
enchanted - influenced as by charms or incantations

bewitched

Translations
References in classic literature ?
There is no nook among the rocks, no brookside, no shade beneath the trees that is not haunted by some shepherd telling his woes to the breezes; wherever there is an echo it repeats the name of Leandra; the mountains ring with "Leandra," "Leandra" murmur the brooks, and Leandra keeps us all bewildered and bewitched, hoping without hope and fearing without knowing what we fear.
They are bewitched, and are obliged to watch over a great treasure which is below in the tower, and they can have no rest until it is taken away, and I have likewise learnt, from their discourse, how that is to be done.
And the time Paddy was bewitched," suggested Sara Ray.
The streak of chalk bewitcheth the hen; the stroke he struck bewitched his weak reason.
The dairyman had not recognized the taste at that time, and thought the butter bewitched.
You're in love with that hateful woman; she has bewitched you
I think I was bewitched in earnest when I was beside that girl
Now, it was precisely about this time that the directress, stung by my coldness, bewitched by my scorn,and excited by the preference she suspected me of cherishing for another, had fallen into a snare of her own laying--was herself caught in the meshes of the very passion with which she wished to entangle me.
And the jolly old dame laughed, and said she thought her daughter was bewitched, for I had no point of a handsome man about me, except being straight and without deformity.
They now discovered a light at some distance, to the great pleasure of Jones, and to the no small terror of Partridge, who firmly believed himself to be bewitched, and that this light was a Jack-with-a-lantern, or somewhat more mischievous.
When the King received the message, he said, 'Let the fellows go; they are bewitched.
Nothing in those days could have been more striking than the vast, empty basins, surrounded by miles of bare quays and the ranges of cargo-sheds, where two or three ships seemed lost like bewitched children in a forest of gaunt, hydraulic cranes.