bewitchment


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

be·witch·ment

 (bĭ-wĭch′mənt)
n.
1.
a. The act of bewitching.
b. The power to bewitch.
c. The state of being bewitched.
2. A bewitching spell.

bewitchment

(bɪˈwɪtʃmənt)
n
1. the state of being bewitched
2. the power of bewitching
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bewitchment - a magical spellbewitchment - a magical spell      
black art, black magic, necromancy, sorcery - the belief in magical spells that harness occult forces or evil spirits to produce unnatural effects in the world
References in classic literature ?
We hoped we would not meet her, for since the affair of the bewitchment of Paddy we did not know quite what to think of Peg; the boldest of us held his breath as we passed her haunts, and drew it again with a sigh of relief when they were safely left behind.
Yes; but there's this difference between love and smallpox, or bewitchment either--that if you detect the disease at an early stage and try change of air, there is every chance of complete escape without any further development of symptoms.
Whereupon he told it: a fantastic piled narrative of bewitchment and miracles that set Shamlegh a-gasping.
The crisis in the Lier maagdenhuis is situated amid a long list of cases of individual and collective possession and bewitchment in the early modern period.
We are informed about the Prophet's bewitchment (p.
were becoming by virtue of some purblind, new-world bewitchment in those
or the most elevated intellectual humor about the philosophy of science or the bewitchment of our minds by means of our language.
Clearly familiar with this line of argument, Lyly must have also been aware of its lack of influence on the popular culture: accusations and trials continued, and cunning-folk were still consulted in the cases of bewitchment.
A correlative, though secondary, purpose was to provide antidotes for various types of bewitchment as well as a prosecutorial guide for Inquisitors.
Throw in some rock segues and jazzy undertones and you're suddenly dealing with something you can easily get lost in and find yourself returning to out of curiosity and bewitchment.
For Korzybski, however, such 'knowledge' is a myth generated by the bewitchment of what he labels elementalistic language; language by which one can distinguish between elements constituting a whole that one cannot, in fact, separate in 'reality.
In fact, witches and demons are almost inevitably linked in the early modern period because, as Philip Almond points out, most demonic possessions for which exorcisms were performed were "the outcome of bewitchment by a witch" (10).